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Posts Tagged ‘Altitude’

Google to switch on ‘semantic search’ within months, emphasize things as well as words

Thursday, March 15th, 2012
Google to switch on

A search engine should be about more than just keywords. MC Hammer believes that passionately and Google must do too, because over the next few months and years it’ll gradually adjust its own algorithms to put greater emphasis on “semantic search”. Under this system, search queries are run through a vast knowledge database that discovers relationships with other words and facts. A Mountain View exec explained it thus: If you search for “Lake Tahoe”, you won’t just get ranked websites containing those two words but also key attributes about the lake, such as its location, altitude, average temperature and Bigfoot population. If a piece of knowledge isn’t the in the ever-expanding database, the search engine will still use semantic search to help it recognize and evaluate information held on websites. In doing this, Big G hopes to compete with social networks that are amassing their own valuable (and sometimes intrusive) databases full of personal information, while also encouraging people to stay longer on its site and see more targeted ads. Google, who is Viviane Reding?

Google to switch on ‘semantic search’ within months, emphasize things as well as words originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 15 Mar 2012 04:32:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceWSJ  | Email this | Comments

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Pentax releases O-GPS1 add-on for DSLRs, appeals to astronomy nuts

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011

Pentax’s Optio WG-1 GPS point-and-shoot satisfied geotaggers out of the box, but owners of its K-5, K-r and 645D DSLRs have had to make do with third-party taggers like the PhotoTrackr or Eye-Fi. The new hotshoe-mounted O-GPS1 module fixes that oversight by recording latitude, longitude, altitude, Coordinated Universal Time and shooting angle. Everyday snappers might find an extra hotshoe attachment cumbersome, but astro-photography enthusiasts could well be enticed by the device’s interesting “ASTROTRACER” function. This helps you take clearer photos of celestial bodies by using the in-built sensors to calculate a star’s movement and then employing the camera’s shake reduction system to compensate. Sounds clever, but be advised: this module is only for Pentax DSLRs — and only for very specific models at that. You’ll get full functionality with the K-5 and K-r cameras, and geotagging (no ASTROTRACER) with the 645D. Oh, and you’ll need to make sure your camera’s firmware is up-to-date. Peer carefully through that lens and you’ll see the O-GPS1 heading for a July landing, priced at $250.

[Thanks, Iddo]

Pentax releases O-GPS1 add-on for DSLRs, appeals to astronomy nuts originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 15:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink MegaPixel  |  sourcePentax  | Email this | Comments

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iPhone 4 falls 1,000 feet from airplane, survives without a scratch

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

When Apple first unveiled its iPhone 4 smartphone last summer, most media and bloggers were in agreement that the new glass construction was stunning. They also agreed, however, that the iPhone 4 would likely be more prone to significant damage than other smartphones due to the fragile nature of glass compared to plastic and metal. While we’ve heard our fair share of shattered iPhone stories, U.S. Air Force Combat Controller Ron Walker’s tale should help dispel the notion that the iPhone 4 is inherently fragile. While leaning out of an airplane looking for landmarks, Walker’s Velcro pocket flap popped open and his iPhone 4 plummeted to the earth below. At the time, the plane was traveling at 150 m.p.h at an altitude of roughly 1,000 feet. Once on the ground, Walker told a few friends what had happened, one of whom installed Apple’s “Find My iPhone” app on his own handset in an attempt to locate Walker’s lost phone. Unexpectedly, the app found Walker’s iPhone immediately and when the men drove to its location, they found the smartphone in perfect working condition without a scratch on it. Walker kept his iPhone in a standard Griffin case and it had no other casing or special protection at the time of its fall.

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PlayStation Move, turntable used to track the Earth’s rotation

Monday, February 21st, 2011
The above pictured contraption, called Copernitron, features a PlayStation Move controller, a turntable, and a homebrew Helmholtz coil (you know, for canceling out interference caused by our planet’s magnetic field). By sending data to a Linux PC via Bluetooth, this bad boy will measure the Earth’s rotation, find geographic north, and determine altitude. Apparently, this is achieved by measuring the controller’s subtle movements as it spins around at 45 RPM. And while the PS Move gyros are much more accurate than those of any other controller on the market, they’re not too accurate: if they were, the designer points out, “ITAR might classify them as missile components. That’s why we can’t have nice motion tracking.” See it in action after the break.

Continue reading PlayStation Move, turntable used to track the Earth’s rotation

PlayStation Move, turntable used to track the Earth’s rotation originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 21 Feb 2011 14:50:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Hack-A-Day  |  sourcepabr.org  | Email this | Comments

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Striker integrated display helmet has something to tell you about that old saying ‘if looks could kill’…

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

We’ve been told in the past that our mean, hate-filled looks could kill, but we never took that literally. Now, if Britain’s BAE Systems has its way, that phrase could seriously have a whole new meaning. The company has developed an RAF helmet that will allow pilots to deploy and steer their weapons by turning their heads. It all sounds incredibly horrifying and futuristic, of course, but the technology which enables the new gadget is pretty intense, as well. The helmet is fitted with an optical head tracker, with targets popping up in the visor, which provides a supposedly highly accurate missile fire with low latency, at any altitude. The system has been extensively tested on the Eurofighter Typhoon, but is modular in styling so that it can be fitted to many systems. There’s no word on when this tech will see actual action, but we have our reservations about it, so we hope they take their time.

Striker integrated display helmet has something to tell you about that old saying ‘if looks could kill’… originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 06 Jan 2011 07:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceDaily Mail  | Email this | Comments

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Mount Everest boasts 3G internet coverage

Saturday, October 30th, 2010

Picture this: you are at the base camp of Mount Everest, only to realize it’s your girlfriends birthday and you forgot to send flowers; what do you do? Grab your cell phone and call the florist of course, as Ncell, Nepal’s mobile operator, now has you covered. The carrier has announced its first 3G base station on the the world’s tallest mountain, allowing users to make calls and connect to the internets from GSM enabled phones. Previously, mountaineers and adventurers had to resort to expensive satellite phones to make calls. Ncell is a joint venture between private investors and Sweden’s Telia Sonera, and currently cover one-third of Nepal. Ncell tested their latest base station by placing the world’s highest video call at 17,388 feet. Telia Sonera’s CEO had the following to say: “This achievement is as mighty as the altitude, as 3G high speed internet will bring faster, more affordable telecommunication services to the people living in the Khumbu Valley, trekkers, and climbers alike.”

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EPFL develops Linux-based swarming micro air vehicles

Monday, September 27th, 2010
The kids at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (or EPFL) have been cooking up quite a bit lately, as this video demonstrates. Not only have they put together a scalable system that will let any flying robot perch in a tree or similar structure, but now they’ve gone and developed a platform for swarming air vehicles (with Linux, nonetheless). Said to be the largest network of its kind, the ten SMAVNET swarm members control their own altitude, airspeed, and turn rate based on input from the onboard gyroscope and pressure sensors. The goal is to develop low cost devices that can be deployed in disaster areas to creat ad hoc communications networks, although we can’t help but think this would make the best Christmas present ever. See for yourself after the break.

Continue reading EPFL develops Linux-based swarming micro air vehicles

EPFL develops Linux-based swarming micro air vehicles originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 27 Sep 2010 12:14:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Make  |  sourceEPFL  | Email this | Comments

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GPS parachutes delivering blood to front lines in the coming years

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

GPS-guided parachutes are nothing new — in fact, we’re guessing that a few are being dropped somewhere in this wide world right now — but a new deal between the Armed Services Blood Program and US Joint Forces Command will allow these devices to start saving even more lives in 2011. As the story goes, a cadre of air-dropped ‘chutes will be sent to the front lines of the battlefield in order to deliver vital blood to medics. For those unaware, blood loss is a major cause of death in war, and by skipping over the lengthy process that’s currently in place for delivery, the powers that be feel that more soldiers can be saved. Reportedly, the JPADS system “is a family of guided parachutes that can carry payloads ranging from about 150 to 60,000 pounds,” and at a predetermined altitude, a “parafoil deploys and a GPS-device steers supplies to an exact target.” The new system, however, will rely on ultralight versions of the aforesaid JPADS in order to sneak into locations that were previously thought impossible to penetrate. ‘Course, all of this will be a moot point once the robot armies rise to power and start pulverizing each other with scrap metal, but hey…

GPS parachutes delivering blood to front lines in the coming years originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 13 Jul 2010 16:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink DailyTech  |  sourceMilitary Blood, Marine Corps Times  | Email this | Comments

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An Airplane Cockpit Bedroom Is All Class, No Business [DIY]

Friday, July 2nd, 2010