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Foxconn builds a fanless nano PC, forgets to put someone else’s name on it

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Foxconn builds a fanless nano PC, forgets to put someone else's name on it

Two nano PCs, actually, and both expected to be announced officially this week according to FanlessTech. The first is the Foxconn AT-5300, running off a 2.13GHz dual-core Cedar Trail D2700, while the second — the AT-5600 — is powered by AMD’s popular (but last-gen) 1.65GHz E450 APU. Each one consumes around 15W idle and 24W under load, which is the equivalent of somewhere between an Ultrabook and a regular laptop and low enough to be passively cooled. What’s distinctly unlaptop-like, though, is the 190 x 135 x 38mm form factor, which should sit discreetly on your desk, below your TV or on a VESA mount, and also the price, which is expected to be under $200 with worldwide availability. As with similar mini-ATX budget barebones, you’ll need to add your own HDD (or maybe a hybrid) to that, but you do get a pair of USB 3.0 ports, Gigabit LAN, a multilingual card reader and built-in 802.11n WiFi. The only thing missing? You guessed it.

Foxconn builds a fanless nano PC, forgets to put someone else’s name on it originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 03 May 2012 11:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Intel’s Ivy Bridge will offer ’20 percent more performance with 20 percent less average power’

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Intel's Ivy Bridge will offer '20 percent more performance with 20 percent less average power'

So, there’s still a little while to go before Intel gives Ivy Bridge a full unveiling, with official benchmarks, pricing and all those trimmings. But in the meantime, the BBC has detailed just how different this new architecture is compared to 32nm chips like Sandy Bridge and also AMD’s coming Trinity processors. Most of this stuff we already knew — like the fact that Intel has switched to a 3D or ‘tri-gate‘ transistor design — but what’s new is a direct and official boast about performance. According Kirk Skaugen, Chipzilla’s PC chief, we can expect Ivy Bridge to deliver “20 percent more processor performance using 20 percent less average power.” Now, judging from leaked desktop and laptop benchmarks, this broad-brush claim masks some very different realities depending on what type of CPU or GPU workloads you want throw at the 3rd-gen Core processor, so stay tuned for more detail very soon.

Intel’s Ivy Bridge will offer ’20 percent more performance with 20 percent less average power’ originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Apr 2012 05:43:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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HP Envy 14 Spectre review

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

In a previous life, the HP Envy 14 was a laptop’s laptop: a 5.69-pound slugger with an optical drive, discrete AMD graphics and a battery that couldn’t last four hours in our battery rundown test. That notebook — one of our favorites in the 2010-2011 year — met its fate last fall when HP redesigned its high-end Envy line, but instead of going wherever it is gadgets go to die it was reincarnated as an Ultrabook. The new Envy 14, dubbed the Spectre, has shed almost two pounds, along with its discrete graphics and outmoded optical drive. It’s also one of the first 14-inch Ultrabooks to hit the market, but even if it weren’t so oddly sized we’d have no trouble remembering it: after all, how many laptops have a built-in NFC chip, or a glass palm rest?

There’s no doubt about it: the Spectre is a premium machine, and it’s not just that HP needed something high-end to take the place of the last-gen Envy 14. This also happens to be the company’s first consumer-grade Ultrabook, and it arrives at a time when there are many to choose from. Enter HP’s marketing department: the outfit’s touting this thing as a “premium Ultrabook” — the kind of machine you’d choose if you wanted a 1600 x 900 IPS-quality display or an unorthodox design. For that kind of beauty, though, you’re looking at $1,400 and up — a princely cost of entry when you consider lots of similarly specced models go for $1,100 or less. But perhaps that splurge comes with more than just a head-turning design? There’s only one way to find out: follow past the break for our in-depth review.

Continue reading HP Envy 14 Spectre review

HP Envy 14 Spectre review originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 14 Mar 2012 00:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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NVIDIA joins Linux Foundation, doesn’t mention driver development

Thursday, March 8th, 2012
It’s a big day for open source fans now that NVIDIA, the last member of the “big three” chip makers with AMD and Intel, has signed on with the Linux foundation. The company has previously kept the system at arms length, with users relying on reverse-engineering to get things working nicely with Linus’ baby. It’s joining Fluenco, Lineo and Mocana, three companies who also became signatories to the foundation at the same time. Whilst there’s no commitment to provide drivers for its chipsets, at least there’s a glimmer of hope that the company will contribute — especially given the growing popularity of its mobile platforms.

Continue reading NVIDIA joins Linux Foundation, doesn’t mention driver development

NVIDIA joins Linux Foundation, doesn’t mention driver development originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 08 Mar 2012 09:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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AMD outs cheap Athlon II X4 Llano-based processors, minus integrated graphics

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Given that superior integrated graphics was one of the key selling points of AMD’s low-power Llano desktop chips, it might seem like a strange move to offer two new Athlon-branded variants that have been stripped of their GPUs. However, while one hand slaps your face, the other hand gives you more cash to spend on a proper graphics card for your ultra-cheap rig — because both the Athlon II X4 641 and it’s lower-power buddy, the 638, are priced at just $81. Go out and buy yourself something nice.

AMD outs cheap Athlon II X4 Llano-based processors, minus integrated graphics originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 10 Feb 2012 12:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Compal Trinity ODM reference design eyes-on

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012
Here at its AMD’s Financial Analyst day, the company had a little demo area which is where we spotted this little number — an ODM reference unit from Compal stuffed with the company’s upcoming Trinity APU. Serving as a proof-of-concept, what you’re looking at is one of several units AMD is currently shopping to OEMs in order to demonstrate its APUs power-sipping frugality and outright performance. This particular design rocks a lower voltage variant of the APU (read: not the 35W part), allowing it to fit in a diminutive 18mm shell. Unfortunately build quality wasn’t exactly what we’d call up to snuff, as it was prone to a lot of flex when we handled it — significantly more than the existing flexing champion, Toshiba’s Z830. Yet, with it scheduled to cost roughly half as much (at roughly $500 or $600), you’ll have to decide exactly how much you value torsional rigidity. Other then that, viewing angles from the demo loop were good and it didn’t disappoint in the the connectivity department, with two USB 3.0 ports, mini-DisplayPort and HDMI flanking its left side, and audio jacks, another USB and Ethernet on along its right. Thin and lights are about to get a whole lot more interesting later in the year, which, frankly is a good thing — it’s about time Chipzilla got some worthy competition.

Compal Trinity ODM reference design eyes-on originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Feb 2012 21:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Sleek and svelte Ultrabooks and tablets might have stolen the limelight from ye old netbook, but that doesn’t mean the less glamorous category is completely bereft of all signs of life. Take for example, Acer’s Aspire One 722. Sure, the 1GHz AMD C-50 powered, Radeon HD 6250 wielding netbook’s internals got more pizzazz in an updated Europe-only edition, but that didn’t stop AT&T from taking the original and giving it a new beginning thanks to shiny new internal WWAN module. Up-to-date silicon it is not, but it could be yours for just $40 a month — provided you sign your life away on a two-year, 3GB per month, contract. Or alternatively, the HSPA+ redux can be had for the unsubsidized price of $450. Decisions, decisions. Pull the trigger at the source link below.

Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Jan 2012 07:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Sleek and svelte Ultrabooks and tablets might have stolen the limelight from ye old netbook, but that doesn’t mean the less glamorous category is completely bereft of all signs of life. Take for example, Acer’s Aspire One 722. Sure, the 1GHz AMD C-50 powered, Radeon HD 6250 wielding netbook’s internals got more pizzazz in an updated Europe-only edition, but that didn’t stop AT&T from taking the original and giving it a new beginning thanks to shiny new internal WWAN module. Up-to-date silicon it is not, but it could be yours for just $40 a month — provided you sign your life away on a two-year, 3GB per month, contract. Or alternatively, the HSPA+ redux can be had for the unsubsidized price of $450. Decisions, decisions. Pull the trigger at the source link below.

Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Jan 2012 07:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Electronista  |  sourceAT&T  | Email this | Comments

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AMD to undercut Intel with cheaper ultrabooks

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

AMD is reportedly planning to undercut Intel by offering cheaper ultrabook components later this year. The notebooks are expected to cost between $700 and $999, which is a good deal cheaper than the $999-$1,200 price tag that many ultrabooks carry now. DigiTimes notes that AMD’s technology will not add any new innovative functions but will instead be focused on delivering consumers thin and light devices at a much more wallet-friendly price. The first round of AMD-powered ultrabooks is expected to hit the market in June.Read

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AMD to undercut Intel with cheaper ultrabooks

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

AMD is reportedly planning to undercut Intel by offering cheaper ultrabook components later this year. The notebooks are expected to cost between $700 and $999, which is a good deal cheaper than the $999-$1,200 price tag that many ultrabooks carry now. DigiTimes notes that AMD’s technology will not add any new innovative functions but will instead be focused on delivering consumers thin and light devices at a much more wallet-friendly price. The first round of AMD-powered ultrabooks is expected to hit the market in June.Read

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Quanta sues AMD, claims it sold defective products

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

Yikes. Quanta — also known as the planet’s largest contract maker of laptops — has just slapped a nasty lawsuit on the world’s second-largest chipmaker. According to Bloomberg, Quanta is alleging that AMD and ATI sold chips that “didn’t meet heat tolerances and were unfit for particular purposes.” Those chips were then used in NEC-labeled machines, and caused them to “malfunction” in some regard. No big deal? Hardly. In the complaint, Quanta states that it has “suffered significant injury to prospective revenue and profits,” and it’s seeking a jury trial and damages for good measure.

As if that weren’t harsh enough, the suit also claims “breach of warranty, negligent misrepresentation, civil fraud and interference with a contract.” When pinged for comment, AMD’s spokesman, Michael Silverman stated: “AMD disputes the allegations in Quanta’s complaint and believes they are without merit. AMD is aware of no other customer reports of the alleged issues with the AMD chip that Quanta used, which AMD no longer sells. “In fact, Quanta has itself acknowledged to AMD that it used the identical chip in large volumes in a different computer platform that it manufactured for NEC without such issues.” Somewhere, Intel has to be smirking.

Quanta sues AMD, claims it sold defective products originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 04 Jan 2012 12:41:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Microsoft leak reveals hotfix for underperforming Bulldozers

Sunday, December 18th, 2011
AMD’s Bulldozer silicon is enormously powerful, but most software isn’t configured to schedule threads for the faux-16 core design. Windows can only see the chip as a quad-core CPU and will randomly assign threads, which ruins the point of Bulldozer’s “Turbo Core” design. Microsoft inadvertently revealed it had teamed up with the chipmaker to fix the problem when it prematurely released a hotfix for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. Initial tests showed that it could improve performance by up to seven percent, before it was pulled — Microsoft conceding that it wasn’t quite ready for prime-time.

Microsoft leak reveals hotfix for underperforming Bulldozers originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 18 Dec 2011 05:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Five Screen Racing Simulator Includes an iPhone For Performance Stats [Video]

Saturday, December 17th, 2011
Powered by an AMD Radeon HD 6870 graphics card, Chad Smith’s five screen racing simulator looks like it provides almost the same thrills as the military’s simulators, without requiring the military’s budget. More »


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Zalman reportedly entering the graphics card market, merging GPUs with cooling solutions

Saturday, December 10th, 2011
Recently leaked slides suggest Korean computer outfit Zalman will soon jump into the ever-expanding graphics card market, initially partnering with AMD on its Radeon series. Known best for its quiet computing technologies, the company’s move to infuse GPUs with cooling solutions could enhance the performance of the cards, making overclocking a lesson in simplicity. The slides only show the AMD 6870, 6850, and 6770, but it’s feasible more models will appear when official news is released. Given AMD’s many board partners, differentiation is important to remain competitive and on their payroll — graphics cards and their overheating habits is Zalman’s cup of tea. Hopefully this brings more innovative products in the coming future (heck, we’ve already got GPU / NIC hybrids), perhaps as early as CES. Check past the break to view the specifications breakdown for the aforementioned cards.

Continue reading Zalman reportedly entering the graphics card market, merging GPUs with cooling solutions

Zalman reportedly entering the graphics card market, merging GPUs with cooling solutions originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 11 Dec 2011 01:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink AnandTech  |  sourceOverclockers.ua  | Email this | Comments

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AMD shaves 800 million transistors from Bulldozer chip, swears nothing’s wrong

Monday, December 5th, 2011

When a company cuts 40 percent of its transistors from an upcoming processor, one question comes to mind: why? According to ExtremeTech, AMD issued an update stating that its Bulldozer eight core / four module CPU would feature 1.2 billion transistors, as opposed to the previously stated two billion transistors. The reduction occurred despite the fact that the die size remains unchanged at 315 square millimeters — putting it on par with AMD’s lesser Llano chip — and depriving the chip of valuable horsepower before I/O, an integrated memory controller or HyperTransport are added. When approached for comment, company representatives stated they were simply correcting a mistake regarding the chip’s actual specifications. Before you bemoan the fate of the Bulldozer chip, remember that the drummer from Def Leppard has had a terrific musical career with only one arm, so what’s the loss of several hundred million transistors to AMD’s latest?

AMD shaves 800 million transistors from Bulldozer chip, swears nothing’s wrong originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 06 Dec 2011 01:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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ASUS U32U with Fusion innards surfaces online, likely coming to the US for $449 and up

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

No, it’s not a Zenbook, but for those of you not in the mood to spend $1,000-plus on your next laptop, it looks like ASUS will soon be selling something at a more… palatable price point. The U32U’s been popping up on the interwebs lately, and it would seem the outfit’s been cooking up a 13.3-incher powered by AMD’s E-4 Fusion APU. Other specs include ATI’s Radeon HD 6320 GPU, 2GB of RAM, a 320GB hard drive, three USB ports (two of the 3.0 variety) and an 8-cell, 5,600mAh battery promising up to 12 hours of runtime. Unlike the ASUS U24e, the U32U seems likely to make it to the U.S. given the poster, which lists the price in US dollars: $509 for the Windows 7 Home Basic model, and $449 for the DOS version. More details at the source link, though we suspect you’ll want to bide your time until next week’s Black Friday scramble anyway.

Continue reading ASUS U32U with Fusion innards surfaces online, likely coming to the US for $449 and up

ASUS U32U with Fusion innards surfaces online, likely coming to the US for $449 and up originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Nov 2011 06:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Acer outs AZ3, AZ5, Veriton Z Series all-in-ones, starting at $650

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Not wanting to be left behind by the AIO hordes, Acer has unveiled a trio of new options for your spick and span desktop. The higher-end AZ5 provides a 23-inch expanse of full HD, multi-touch glory, a minimum Core i3-2120 processor, 4GB of DDR3 memory and a 1TB HDD, all for the sum of $750. Next up is the AZ3, which saves you $100 by cutting the screen size to 21 inches, switching to an AMD dual-core A4 APU (along with a discreet Radeon HD6410) and slimming the HDD down to 500GB. Both models come with an adjustable stand, two side-mounted USB 3.0 ports (plus four USB 2.0 ports on the rear) and a built-in webcam and mic. Meanwhile, Acer’s new Veriton all-in-ones target enterprise users who are prepared to sacrifice those high-def media credentials in favor of better performance and a smaller, more office-friendly footprint — the 20-inch Z2620G, for instance, packs a Core i5-2400s quad-core processor and NVIDIA GeFore GT 520M GPU for $850. All the new models are available in densely populated areas as of right now, and you’ll find more details in the PR after the break.

Continue reading Acer outs AZ3, AZ5, Veriton Z Series all-in-ones, starting at $650

Acer outs AZ3, AZ5, Veriton Z Series all-in-ones, starting at $650 originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 01 Nov 2011 00:34:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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