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Mass Effect moaners kinda get their own way as people power strikes again

Monday, April 9th, 2012
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SPOILERS. Who can’t name a beloved TV series that didn’t end the way you wanted? BSG? Lost? Sapphire and Steel? Blake’s Seven? Quantum Leap? The Sopranos? All of which ended either with tear-inducing bum-notes or confusing conclusions that caused furious head scratching. Despite that, the traditional reaction is to say “Well, I didn’t enjoy that, but I respect the writer’s artistic decision.” Not so for gamers who felt short-changed by the intentionally devastating conclusion to Mass Effect 3. Fans of the game poured their outrage online, developer BioWare saying that the feedback it had received was “incredibly painful.” A fan campaign that raised $80,000 in under a fortnight for Child’s Play was enough to make the team behind the title concede defeat against the geo-political disruptor that is the internet with a cause. The company is now devoting all of its efforts to producing an “extended cut” DLC for the summer, but fans expecting a fourth ending where they can watch Commander Shepard on a sun-lounger, margarita in hand had better start complaining now — the new content will only offer more depth and an extended epilogue to those tragic scenes you’ve already witnessed. SPOILERS END

Continue reading Mass Effect moaners kinda get their own way as people power strikes again

Mass Effect moaners kinda get their own way as people power strikes again originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 09 Apr 2012 08:49:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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UK’s National Media Museum opens permanent ‘Life Online’ gallery

Thursday, March 29th, 2012
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Planning to be in the neighborhood of Bradford, England anytime soon? Then you may want to set aside some time for a visit to the National Media Museum, which will tomorrow officially open what’s being described as the “world’s first gallery dedicated to exploring the social, technological and cultural impact of the internet.” Dubbed “Life Online” the new gallery will feature one permanent section focused on the history of the internet, and another section that will change each year and feature different “experimental themes” commissioned by artists — the first being an examination of the open source movement. As the BBC reports, that’s the result of some £2 million in funding, as well as contributions from the likes of Vint Cerf, who’s featured in some of the videos produced for the exhibit (you can see those at the YouTube link below).

Continue reading UK’s National Media Museum opens permanent ‘Life Online’ gallery

UK’s National Media Museum opens permanent ‘Life Online’ gallery originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 30 Mar 2012 01:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BBC News  |  sourceNational Media Museum, YouTube  | Email this | Comments

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Plasmonic cloak makes objects invisble, but only in the microwave region of the spectrum

Saturday, January 28th, 2012

Okay, so we’re not up to USS Pegasus levels yet, but for the first time researchers have been able to cloak a three dimensional object. Don’t start planning your first trip to the Hogwarts library restricted section just yet though, the breakthrough is only in the microwave region of the EM spectrum. Using a shell of plasmonic materials, it’s possible to create a “photo negative” of the object being cloaked in order to make it disappear. The technique is different to the use of metamaterials, which try to bounce light around the object. Instead, plasmonics try to deceive the light as to what’s actually there at the time — but because it has to be tailored to create a “negative image” of the object you’re hiding, it’s not as flexible, but it could be an important step on the road to that bank heist we’ve been planning.

Plasmonic cloak makes objects invisble, but only in the microwave region of the spectrum originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 28 Jan 2012 04:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BBC News  |  sourceNJP  | Email this | Comments

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BBC launches news app for Sony connected TV, joins Samsung and Panasonic

Sunday, January 8th, 2012
Trading tradition for tech, the BBC has officially launched its news app for Sony connected TVs — joining the ranks of its other offerings made for Samsung and Panasonic displays. With a third TV app under its belt, the Beeb is already talking about launching a fourth HTML-based variant designed to access all the newsy goodness from Virgin Media’s TiVo boxes. Recently trading its Flash site for an HTML5 upgrade and launching its iPlayer for iPhone app in the UK, there’s no doubt Austin Powers won’t even recognize the joint when cryogenically unfrozen. Check out the tribute track after the break.

Continue reading BBC launches news app for Sony connected TV, joins Samsung and Panasonic

BBC launches news app for Sony connected TV, joins Samsung and Panasonic originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 08 Jan 2012 05:41:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceBBC Internet Blog  | Email this | Comments

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Hackers planning homespun anti-censorship satellite internet

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012
SOPA is making ordinary, decent internet users mad as hell, and they’re not gonna take it anymore. Hacker attendees of Berlin’s Chaos Communication Congress are cooking up a plan to launch a series of homemade satellites as the backbone of an “uncensorable (sic) internet in space.” Like all good ideas, there’s a few hurdles to overcome first: objects in lower-Earth orbit circle the earth every 90 minutes, useless for a broadband satellite that needs to remain geostationary. Instead, a terrestrial network of base stations will have to be installed in order to remain in constant contact as it spins past, at the cost of €100 ($130) per unit. The conference also stated a desire to get an amateur astronaut onto the moon within 23 years, which we’d love to see, assuming there’s still a rocket fuel store on eBay.

Hackers planning homespun anti-censorship satellite internet originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 03 Jan 2012 13:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BBC News  |  sourceHackerspace Global Grid  | Email this | Comments

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Samsung Wins Its Appeal—Galaxy Tabs Are Back on Sale in Australia [Lawuits]

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

New developments in atomic clock technology beat accuracy records, may inspire Ke$ha’s next hit

Sunday, August 28th, 2011

According to a recent Penn State study that uses a new way to calculate time-telling precision, the CsF2 cesium-based atomic clock at the UK’s National Physical Laboratory is almost twice as accurate as originally thought — meaning it will only gain or lose one single second over the course of 138 million years. This atomic clock isn’t the only competitor for best-in-show, as researchers at the University of Tokyo have also announced a new record, claiming their optical lattice atomic clock observes atoms a million times faster than a traditional atomic clock — achieving accuracy up to 18 digits in a one second measurement. Although researchers say the technology would gain or lose a second significantly faster than the cesium-based variety (31.7 million years), it could change the way scientists perceive time and space, giving us new insights into fundamental constants of physics.

“Until now, clocks have been thought of as tools for sharing common time. But with clocks like this, conversely, we can understand that time passes at different speeds, depending on the time and place a clock is at,” said Hidetoshi Katori of the University of Tokyo. Of course, both atomic clocks can help us stay timely, but they also have practical applications for everything from deep-space networking, to predicting earthquakes and GPS navigation. With this type of accuracy, looks like none of us will be getting away with showing up late to work anymore. Check out a video about the optical lattice clock after the break.

Continue reading New developments in atomic clock technology beat accuracy records, may inspire Ke$ha’s next hit

New developments in atomic clock technology beat accuracy records, may inspire Ke$ha’s next hit originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 29 Aug 2011 01:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BBC News  |  sourceNPL  | Email this | Comments

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British judge doesn’t like the cut of Newzbin 2′s jib, orders BT to block it

Friday, July 29th, 2011

Shiver-me-timbers, it looks like the movie studios’ latest legal broadside just scored a direct hit against the big bad pirate ship. A UK judge has ordered telecoms giant BT to block its subscribers from visiting Newzbin 2, a site which aggregates Usenet downloads, on the simple basis that BT knows some of its customers are using the the site to breach copyright law and therefore has a duty to stop them. This counts as an unprecedented victory for the Motion Picture Association, who brought the case, and it potentially arms them with a new weapon to force ISPs to block other sites in future. Could that be Newzbin 3 we spy on the horizon?

British judge doesn’t like the cut of Newzbin 2′s jib, orders BT to block it originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 08:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BBC News  |  sourceHigh Court ruling [PDF]  | Email this | Comments

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China shuts down two fake Apple Stores

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Chinese trade officials have raided and shut down two of five fake Apple Stores in Kunming, BBC News reported on Monday. The two stores weren’t closed for impersonating an Apple Store, instead both were shuttered for lacking business licenses. Travel blog BirdAbroad brought attention to the fake stores last week when it detailed one convincing shop in Kunming that sold real Apple products. That shop has not been closed because it “has a license to trade and is selling genuine Apple products,” BBC News said. Several of the store’s employees believe that they work for a real Apple Store. The Cupertino-based company has yet to respond to the growing number of illegitimate outlets.

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BBC News for Android now available for all

Friday, June 10th, 2011

In May BBC launched its official BBC News Android application, but unfortunately it was only available in the UK after its debut. Now Android users worldwide can download and install the application from the Android Market. We typically used to install third-party BBC News apps, but the official one blows those out of the water. Top stories are side-scrollable with beautiful headline thumbnails, and you can easily quickly listen to the World News Bulletin, the Live BBC World Service, or view a quick 1-minute global news summary — all from the home screen. There’s also an option to be notified of breaking news stories. If you’re a news fiend, this app is a must have.

[Via Android Central]

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BBC launches official Android app

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

BBC announced the availability of its free mobile news application for Android on Wednesday. The application provides quick access to BBC’s top stories complete with pictures, videos, and the option to share stories on Facebook or via email. Other features include breaking news notifications, pre-cache viewing, background sync, and a compact widget for viewing headlines from your home screen. There’s even an option to stream live BBC News video content, provided you’re running a phone with Android 2.2 and Flash pre-installed. BBC News for Android is available for free in the Android Market now.

[Via Gizmodo]

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BBC News App Now Available For Android [Apps]

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Stanford wants to roll its own paper batteries

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

It was only a couple of months ago that MIT was wooing us with the energy-preserving properties of carbon nanotubes, and in a classic act of oneupmanship Stanford has now come out and demonstrated paper batteries, which work thanks to a carbon nanotube and silver nanowire “ink.” We’ve seen this idea before, but the ability to just douse a sheet of paper in the proper magical goo and make a battery out of it is as new as it is mindblowing. Battery weight can, as a result, be reduced by 20 percent, and the fast energy discharge of this technology lends itself to utilization in electric vehicles. The video after the break should enlighten and thrill you in equal measures.

Continue reading Stanford wants to roll its own paper batteries

Stanford wants to roll its own paper batteries originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 09 Dec 2009 05:29:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Norway’s Statkraft kick-starts world’s first osmotic power plant

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009
It may only produce enough power to heat an electric kettle at the moment, but Norway’s Statkraft says that its new, first-of-its-kind osmotic power plant could be producing as much energy as a small wind farm by 2015, and continue to grow from there on out. To do that, the company guides fresh water and salt water into separate chambers that are divided by an artificial membrane, and when the process of osmosis takes place — salt molecules pulling freshwater through the membrane — the pressure is increased on the sea water side. That, of course, doesn’t get you power on its own, but the pressure is apparently enough to drive a power generating turbine, and if you have enough of those you have a power plant. A bit of effort, to be sure, but the process doesn’t emit any greenhouse gases, is completely renewable, and it doesn’t depend on the wind or the sun being out.

Norway’s Statkraft kick-starts world’s first osmotic power plant originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 25 Nov 2009 14:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BBC News  |  sourceStatkraft  | Email this | Comments

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