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Posts Tagged ‘Brains’

Huawei announces global availability of the Ascend P1 smartphone

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Huawei on Wednesday announced global availability of its flagship Ascend P1 smartphone. The Android 4.0-powered handset will be available in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Australia by May, in Latin America by June and in Europe for the summer, with availability in other markets to follow. “The global availability of the Ascend P1, which combines smart features and a sexy design, represents a significant milestone for Huawei Device,” said Richard Yu, Chairman of Huawei. “We are sending strong signals of our intention to transform into a consumer-facing brand and extend our market leadership globally by strengthening our range of flagship products. We are also expanding our sales and distribution channels to move beyond a focus on operators.” The Ascend P1 is equipped with a 4.3-inch qHD Super AMOLED display, a dual-core TI OMAP 4460 processor clocked at 1.5GHz and an 8-megapixel rear camera. Read on for Huawei’s press release.

Huawei Announces Global Availability of the Ascend P1 – its Flagship Dual-Core Smartphone

Beijing, China, April 18, 2012: Huawei, a leading global information and communications technology (ICT) solutions provider, today announced that the Huawei Ascend P1 will be available in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Australia through operators and retailers by May 2012, in Latin America from June 2012 and in Europe from summer, with availability in other markets to follow.

“The global availability of the Ascend P1, which combines smart features and a sexy design, represents a significant milestone for Huawei Device. We are sending strong signals of our intention to transform into a consumer-facing brand and extend our market leadership globally by strengthening our range of flagship products. We are also expanding our sales and distribution channels to move beyond a focus on operators,” said Richard Yu, Chairman of Huawei Device.

The Ascend P1 is beauty meets brains – proof that technology and good looks can go hand-in-hand. It features a dual-core 1.5GHz TI OMAP 4460 Cortext-A9 processor and measures 7.69mm thin and 64.8 mm long, providing a very comfortable grip. With a 4.3-inch super AMOLED 960 x 540 touch screen with Corning® Gorilla® Glass, an 8-megapixel BSI rear-facing camera and Dolby Mobile 3.0 + 5.1 surround sound technology, the Ascend P1 provides a home theatre experience in the palm of your hands.

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Want to Look Two Inches Taller? Try Holding a Gun [Guns]

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

A core tenet of the human “fight or flight” response begs the question, is this guy bigger than me? A recent study suggests that answer depends on if he’s wielding or not. Turns out, our brains might give a subconscious size advantage to opponents if they’re holding a weapon. More »


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North America’s Biggest Collection of Carnivorous Plants Is a Rather Large Shop of Horrors [Video]

Saturday, April 7th, 2012
Pitcher plants are so large that they can digest entire rats without thinking twice—that is, if they had brains or a nervous system. And at California Carnivores outside of Sebastopol, California, they have an entire nursery full of them. Venus fly traps too, and a whole collection of plants that have a taste for flesh. So let that digest for bit. [Cool Hunting] More »


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Gunze’s new touchscreen tech knows who’s touching it

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012
Gunze

Touchscreens can’t differentiate between you, your friend or your cat. Truth is, they’re actually amazingly simple pieces of technology without much in the way of brains. A new type of display shown off at the International Nanotechnology Exhibition & Conference in Tokyo last week does imbue the panels with at least enough smarts to tell people apart. Gunze Ltd pairs a special capacitive screen with electrodes, which a user touches with one hand while interacting with a game or app. The immediate use would be for table-top arcade games, which would differentiate between up to four different players based on what particular circuit they complete when touching the screen. We wouldn’t be shocked if a version of the tech started showing up in multi-player video poker machines and bar games relatively soon.

Gunze’s new touchscreen tech knows who’s touching it originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 21 Feb 2012 16:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Ubergizmo  |  sourceTech-On  | Email this | Comments

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This May Be the iPad 3 Shell [Rumor]

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

FXI’s Cotton Candy could turn every screen you own into a cloud client

Thursday, November 17th, 2011
It’s a truth universally acknowledged, that a user in possession of a good number of devices must be in want of a unified way to use them all. As it stands, that mythical interface doesn’t exist; but hopefully that’s set to change soon. Norway’s FXI is heralding a device codenamed Cotton Candy; a USB/ HDMI stick that can connect to nearly anything that’s packing a display. Inside the stick is a dual-core ARM Cortex A9 and quad-core ARM Mali-400MP GPU that can handle 1080p video, 802.11 b/g/n WIFi, Bluetooth v2.1 and microSD card storage, expandable up to 64GB. Plug it into a laptop or desktop and you’ll be able to use a thin-layer client to access your personal cloud, or via HDMI into a HDTV to be controlled using Bluetooth peripherals, smartphones and tablets. Being able to open “your” desktop on any device means you can conduct presentations, access media content and surf the web without ties. FXI is a new player in the market, but the founder was previously the brains behind Falanx, which created the technology that powers ARM’s Mali GPUs. It’s working with various manufacturers with the aim of partnering up to get the devices into stores in the second half of next year, the expected cost being under $200 — although we’d pay more if they threw in a bag of the real, teeth-destroying stuff.

Continue reading FXI’s Cotton Candy could turn every screen you own into a cloud client

FXI’s Cotton Candy could turn every screen you own into a cloud client originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 Nov 2011 18:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Our Divided Brains Might Be Making Us Unhappy: A Plea for a More Right-Brained World [Video]

Friday, October 21st, 2011

GM demos accident avoidance system with brains and long range

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011
GM Collision Avoidance

Collision avoidance systems aren’t exactly exciting new news any more. But most of these systems, even the ones that jerk the wheel out of your hands, simply detect obstacles — they don’t talk to each other. GM’s new prototype uses Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) to share data with other vehicles. The cars not only detect other motorists, but construction zones, police activity, and slowed or stopped traffic. Unlike a similar concept from Ford, GM doesn’t just talk to cars in the immediate area, but can detect trouble up to a quarter mile down the road, offering plenty of warning time for you to change course or hit those breaks. We think the company’s estimate that such a system could avoid 81-percent of crashes in the US is a tad optimistic though — clearly they don’t realize how big of jerks most drivers are.

GM demos accident avoidance system with brains and long range originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 20 Oct 2011 01:21:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How a Lab Extracts Brains from NFL Players in the Name of Science [Sports]

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

DNA-based artificial neural network is a primitive brain in a test tube (video)

Saturday, July 30th, 2011
Neuron and DNA

Many simpler forms of life on this planet, including some of our earliest ancestors, don’t have proper brains. Instead they have networks of neurons that fire in response to stimuli, triggering reactions. Scientists from Caltech have actually figured out how to create such a primitive pre-brain using strands of DNA. Researchers, led by Lulu Qian, strung together DNA molecules to create bio-mechanical circuits. By sequencing the four bases of our genetic code in a particular way, they were able to program it to respond differently to various inputs. To prove their success the team quizzed the organic circuit, essentially playing 20 questions, feeding it clues to the identity of a particular scientist using more DNA strands. The artificial neural network nailed answer every time. Check out the PR and pair of videos that dig a little deeper into the experiment after the break.

Continue reading DNA-based artificial neural network is a primitive brain in a test tube (video)

DNA-based artificial neural network is a primitive brain in a test tube (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 30 Jul 2011 16:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Cellphones are dangerous / not dangerous: cancer experts say ‘What, me worry?’

Monday, July 4th, 2011

If you haven’t already gotten whiplash from the ongoing cellphone-cancer debate, a freshly released scientific review might just do the trick. In the paper, published Friday, a panel of experts from Britain, Sweden and the US conducted a thorough survey of previous studies, before concluding that existing literature is “increasingly against” the theory that cellphone use causes brain tumors in adults. The researchers also questioned the biological mechanisms underpinning this hypothesis, while acknowledging some lingering uncertainties, since data on childhood tumors and longer-term research are still lacking.

The results come just a few weeks after the World Health Organization released its own literature review, in which it claimed that cell phones should be considered “potentially carcinogenic.” But Anthony Swerdlow, a professor at Britain’s Institute of Cancer Research and leader of the most recent investigation, said his group’s work doesn’t necessarily contradict the WHO, since the latter was simply seeking to evaluate cancer risks according to its own “pre-set classification system” — under which things like pickled vegetables and coffee are also considered “potentially carcinogenic.” Unfortunately, this doesn’t mean that the debate will die down anytime soon, though Swerdlow expects more definitive conclusions within the next few years — assuming, of course, that all of our brains haven’t turned to oatmeal by then.

Cellphones are dangerous / not dangerous: cancer experts say ‘What, me worry?’ originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 04 Jul 2011 06:19:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Inside the State Department’s 24/7 Digital Peace Room [Government]

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Researchers build synthetic synapse circuit, prosthetic brains still decades away

Monday, April 25th, 2011

Building a franken-brain has long been a holy grail of sorts for scientists, but now a team of engineering researchers have made what they claim to be a significant breakthrough towards that goal. Alice Parker and Chongwu Zhou of USC used carbon nanotubes to create synthetic synapse circuits that mimic neurons, the basic building blocks of the brain. This could be invaluable to AI research, though the team still hasn’t tackled the problem of scope — our brains are home to 100 billion neurons, each of which has 10,000 synapses. Moreover, these nanotubes are critically lacking in plasticity — they can’t form new connections, produce new neurons, or adapt with age. All told, the scientists say, we’re decades away from having fake brains — or even sections of it — but if the technology advances as they hope it will, people might one day be able to recover from devastating brain injuries and drive cars smart enough to avert deadly accidents.

Continue reading Researchers build synthetic synapse circuit, prosthetic brains still decades away

Researchers build synthetic synapse circuit, prosthetic brains still decades away originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 25 Apr 2011 19:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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