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Posts Tagged ‘Fair Share’

Samsung Galaxy S II Skyrocket HD for AT&T gets the FCC nod

Thursday, March 8th, 2012
To its credit, AT&T’s version of the Samsung Galaxy S II HD LTE — known as the Skyrocket HD — has managed to elude its fair share of Mr. Blurrycams and other leaks for a full two months since it was originally announced at the carrier’s Developer Summit. Now the device, listed as the SGH-I757, has stepped one foot closer to the daylight, thanks to the FCC looking it up and down and nodding in approval. We still don’t have a date or price, but at least we have a solid indication that Ma Bell hasn’t simply forgotten about the smartphone or tossed it to the wayside. Sadly, we couldn’t eke many new details out of the massive stack of paperwork — just the usuals, like LTE 700 / 1700 support with WCDMA 850 / 1900 radios — but we found one interesting bit. The model supports two battery covers: one with an NFC antenna, and one without. Knowing AT&T’s reluctance to flip the NFC switch on other devices, we won’t be surprised if the latter option is included with the final production units — or will it just be built into the battery like its predecessors? As always, time will tell.

Continue reading Samsung Galaxy S II Skyrocket HD for AT&T gets the FCC nod

Samsung Galaxy S II Skyrocket HD for AT&T gets the FCC nod originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 08 Mar 2012 15:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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T-Mobile’s next myTouch to come from Huawei?

Saturday, March 3rd, 2012
The Magenta carrier’s pumped out its fair share of myTouch handsets in the past months, and we can’t blame you if you’re confused by the fact that different OEMs have had their turn making the devices. Now, if a report by PocketNow is to be believed, the next phone maker in line is the same one that brought you that T-Mobile Springboard. And, if we take into consideration Huawei’s recent push towards the US market, it wouldn’t surprise us to see T-Mo’s future myTouch lineup coming from the Chinese outfit. Allegedly, the device(s) will come in two Gingerbread-packing flavors, one of which is said to be sporting physical QWERTY keys — à la the 4G Slide. While we know some of you are ready to part ways with the ol’ timer 3G variant, it may be a while before the purported U8680 and U8730 are the real deal. Good news is MWC isn’t exactly giving you a shortage of options.

T-Mobile’s next myTouch to come from Huawei? originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 03 Mar 2012 23:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink TmoNews  |  sourcePocketNow  | Email this | Comments

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BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 said to launch on February 21st

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

When Research In Motion released its BlackBerry PlayBook tablet, the device had its fair share of problems. RIM promised an operating system update that would address these problems but the launch was delayed by several months. A new report from N4BB claims the official release of the PlayBook 2.0 update is set for February 21st, just over a week later than the company initially planned. The PlayBook OS 2.0 update will include native email, calendar and contacts apps, but unfortunately native BBM will remain absent from the tablet and can only be accessed through BlackBerry Bridge.
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Fisker Karma battery poses ‘potential safety issue’ for about 50 autos, fix already in tow

Tuesday, December 27th, 2011

Fisker has seen its fair share of delays on its Karma EV in the past, and now ”fewer than 50″ of the vehicles — which if you’ll recall, cost over $100K — are at risk for battery malfunction. According to Bloomberg Businessweek, A123 (the company which supplies the car’s power pack) has issued a memo to customers and stakeholders, noting that “in rare circumstances” the car’s batts could short-circuit due to coolant leakage from “misaligned hose clamps.” A123 further explained that’s already begun repairing the Karma’s in question, and doesn’t expect to experience to strain its relationship with Fisker due to the problem. Notably, Bloomberg also reports that 25 of the automobiles get assembled daily, with about 225 currently en-route to showroom floors — a far cry from the company’s earlier estimates for the 2011 production year. You’ll find A123′s full PDF memo at the source link below.

Fisker Karma battery poses ‘potential safety issue’ for about 50 autos, fix already in tow originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 27 Dec 2011 03:38:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Autoblog Green, Green Car Congress  |  sourceBloomberg Buisnessweek, A123 (PDF)  | Email this | Comments

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Pantech Breakout shows its darling face in the wild

Saturday, September 17th, 2011
The Pantech Breakout, Verizon’s least-hyped LTE phone this side of the Droid Bionic, has seen a fair amount of time splayed out on paper without getting its fair share of closeups. This has finally changed, however, now that Droid-Life was able to get its hands on true-blue images of the device. It appears to be a unit that’s already arrived in a Verizon retail outlet, lending credence to the rumor that the 4-inch Android handset will be available for our purchase next week. Unfortunately, Verizon’s still acting as if the phone doesn’t exist, so we’ll just have to strum our fingers on the desk for (hopefully) just a few more days to see if it’ll get acknowledged.

Pantech Breakout shows its darling face in the wild originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 17 Sep 2011 06:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink UnwiredView  |  sourceDroid-Life  | Email this | Comments

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Logitech Revue gets second Honeycomb leak, TV apps sneak into Market

Thursday, September 15th, 2011

Did you empty your piggy bank for a Logitech Revue after the first Honeycomb sighting about a month ago? If not, there’s new fuel for the Google TV set-top box hacking fire… so get your Hamiltons in order. Channel Android’s latest reel showcases a newer, more polished leak of Honeycomb that reflects the preview we spotted running on Sony hardware last week. It’s not without its fair share of bugs, and you’ll need to install the first leak to avoid turning your device into a paperweight (read: brick), so proceed at your own risk. Also of note: apps built specifically for TV have started to pop up in the marketplace — it seems devs have been busy since Google dropped the SDK a while back. For a closer look at the payoff straight from the hive, take a look at the video above or check out a slideshow of some Google TV apps that are in the Market now put together by NewTeeVee.

Logitech Revue gets second Honeycomb leak, TV apps sneak into Market originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 15 Sep 2011 19:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Droid-Life  |  sourceChannel Android (YouTube), NewTeeVee  | Email this | Comments

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Ask Engadget: best wireless keyboard for tablet use?

Saturday, August 20th, 2011

We know you’ve got questions, and if you’re brave enough to ask the world for answers, here’s the outlet to do so. This week’s Ask Engadget inquiry is coming to us from Pete, who reckons a tablet + keyboard combo will be best for his future note-taking. If you’re looking to send in an inquiry of your own, drop us a line at ask [at] engadget [dawt] com.

“I will be attending college next year and figured that getting a tablet + keyboard combination to take to class instead of a netbook or small laptop would be a better idea. I was looking into getting the ASUS Eee Pad Transformer, but my grandparents gave me an iPad 2 as a graduation present. A friend of mine is considering getting the Transformer, but doesn’t want to pay $150 for a keyboard dock. Both of us will be using our tablets for essentially the same purpose and we were both wondering what the best wireless keyboard was for a tablet. Thanks!”

We’ve definitely tested our fair share of tablet-focused keyboards, but none of ‘em have actually struck us as ideal. The newly-released Lenovo Folio case is a gem, but alas, only functions with the ThinkPad Tablet. So, bright minds — any ideas for Pete and his pal? Drop ‘em in comments below.

Ask Engadget: best wireless keyboard for tablet use? originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 20 Aug 2011 22:19:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sprint iPhone could launch before Christmas, analyst says

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

On Wednesday, Citadel Securities analyst Shing Yin said that an iPhone launch on Sprint is ever more likely since Verizon Wireless’ announcement that it will move from unlimited data plans to tiered data pricing on July 7th. According to Barron’s, Yin believes that Apple will be more compelled than ever to launch a device on Sprint, given that it’s the last remaining of the big four U.S. wireless carriers to offer a truly unlimited data option. “We believe Sprint could capture more than its fair share of iPhone sales, especially if it gets the new model at the same time as AT&T and Verizon.” Yin explained. “We see little reason for Apple to hold back,” he argued, noting that Sprint most likely would attempt to launch the device before the holiday season this year. “[Sprint] could offer an attractive proposition for more price-conscious users (a demographic we think is increasingly important to Apple following the rise of Android,” he said. “[It] could be a relatively stronger seller than the Verizon iPhone.”

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iPhone 4 falls 1,000 feet from airplane, survives without a scratch

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

When Apple first unveiled its iPhone 4 smartphone last summer, most media and bloggers were in agreement that the new glass construction was stunning. They also agreed, however, that the iPhone 4 would likely be more prone to significant damage than other smartphones due to the fragile nature of glass compared to plastic and metal. While we’ve heard our fair share of shattered iPhone stories, U.S. Air Force Combat Controller Ron Walker’s tale should help dispel the notion that the iPhone 4 is inherently fragile. While leaning out of an airplane looking for landmarks, Walker’s Velcro pocket flap popped open and his iPhone 4 plummeted to the earth below. At the time, the plane was traveling at 150 m.p.h at an altitude of roughly 1,000 feet. Once on the ground, Walker told a few friends what had happened, one of whom installed Apple’s “Find My iPhone” app on his own handset in an attempt to locate Walker’s lost phone. Unexpectedly, the app found Walker’s iPhone immediately and when the men drove to its location, they found the smartphone in perfect working condition without a scratch on it. Walker kept his iPhone in a standard Griffin case and it had no other casing or special protection at the time of its fall.

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Activision and Sega show off Wappy Dog dogbot / Nintendo DS game at Toy Fair 2011

Monday, February 21st, 2011

Toy Fair 2011 isn’t quite as big a deal as say, CES or MWC, but it still has its fair share of nifty plaything gadgets. One jewel of the show is Sega’s Wappy Dog toy that interfaces with with Activision’s Nintendo DS title of the same name. In what amounts to the logical evolutionary conclusion of the artist formerly known as Tamagotchi, Wappy Dog allows folks to communicate with their digital pets not only via the DS, but also by playing with and training their pooch’s robotic doppelgänger. After playing with DS Wappy, the game automatically syncs up with the toy bot to keep it from developing multiple personality disorder. Though currently a prototype, the toy can dance (hopefully with a little more flava than its iDog cousin), whine, and bark in response to your child’s interactions, and is slated for a release this fall at an unknown price point. No need to thank us for finding your next family pet.

Activision and Sega show off Wappy Dog dogbot / Nintendo DS game at Toy Fair 2011 originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 21 Feb 2011 19:31:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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VCR head gets Frankenstiened into a beefy momentum scroll wheel

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010

We’ve seen a fair share of VCR hacking in our day, but this momentum scroll wheel built from an old VCR head by Instructables community member Osgeld sets a new bar for jerry-rigging dead technology. Apparently the project arose from a desire to find a 21st century-approved use for the circular part that was gathering dust after being stripped from a spare Sony VHS player. The result is a bulky, yet useful, scroll wheel that can easily be set into motion and sustained via its own inertia to keep spinning for long periods. That feature could prove useful to anyone saddled with a mountain of video editing work, or even you lazy folk just hoping to flick less while reading the web. Unfortunately, a quick glance at Osgeld’s DIY tool and part lists indicate you’ll need to do quite a bit more than ransack a tape player to get this job done right. But then, when do the good things in life ever come easy?

VCR head gets Frankenstiened into a beefy momentum scroll wheel originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 08 Dec 2010 01:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Lifehacker  |  sourceInstrutables  | Email this | Comments

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Micron embeds error correction in flash memory chips, calls it ClearNAND

Sunday, December 5th, 2010

Solid state storage is fantastic stuff, durable and lightning-quick, but it’s got its fair share of quirks — bits fail, pages fill up, and cells deteriorate over time. Typically, the onus is on a beefy controller to take care of your drive and make sure it lasts a good long while (which is why brand names like SandForce can make or break an SSD) but it looks like Micron is planning to usurp some of that responsibility with its new ClearNAND chips. Simply put, each ClearNAND memory module has a built-in 24-bit error correction engine, so your drive’s host controller doesn’t have to shoulder that load, and can focus on the good stuff — like getting your data delivered at speeds that would obliterate traditional hard drives. Micron says the new chips are available right now in 25nm sizes. Want a more technical rundown? Hit up our more coverage link to hear what this might mean for the error-prone future of the medium. PR after the break.

Continue reading Micron embeds error correction in flash memory chips, calls it ClearNAND

Micron embeds error correction in flash memory chips, calls it ClearNAND originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 05 Dec 2010 18:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink PhysOrg  |  sourceMicron  | Email this | Comments

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MacBook Air review (late 2010)

Tuesday, October 26th, 2010

The MacBook Air has never exactly been a simple product to review. Since the laptop’s launch back in the heady days of 2008, we’ve always considered it a niche, high-end product and much less a mainstream system. Originally, the wafer-thin (and somewhat underpowered) laptop sold for a painful starting price of $1,799, and had its fair share of problems. Well, we’ve come a long way from Apple’s original play, with two all-new models of the Air. The first is an update to the standard 13.3-inch model priced at a significantly cheaper $1,299, while the newest entrant to the MacBook family is a tiny 11.6-inch model that’s nearly the size of an iPad — and not wildly more expensive, starting at $999. Of course, over time the market for laptops of this type has gotten quite crowded, with a slew of ULV-based thin-and-lights that offer lots of options for lots of budgets. Do the new MacBook Airs have enough to take on a crowded market, or have they been bumped out of the game altogether? Read on for the full Engadget review to find out!

Continue reading MacBook Air review (late 2010)

MacBook Air review (late 2010) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 26 Oct 2010 19:49:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Motorola Droid X gets cinematic ‘See You Tomorrow’ trailer (video)

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010

Yeah, we said trailer. The Droid family has seen its fair share of atypical ads, and while this one won’t tug on your heartstrings, it’ll definitely captivate. Unless you’re already three sheets to the wind and well on your way into an early weekend. Either way, you should really have a look after the break.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in]

Continue reading Motorola Droid X gets cinematic ‘See You Tomorrow’ trailer (video)

Motorola Droid X gets cinematic ‘See You Tomorrow’ trailer (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 14 Jul 2010 23:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How would you change HTC’s Droid Incredible?

Friday, June 11th, 2010

Yeah, we called it the best Android device in America during our review back in April, and even today it’s somewhat difficult to track down, but that’s not to suggest that HTC’s Droid Incredible is free of flaws. The Sense-enabled smartphone is the current flagship in VZW’s stable, and while the EVO 4G may offer faster connections (in select locales) and a larger display, the Droid Incredible still has its fair share of proponents. This space, however, is where we all take a deep breath, a step back and quick sip of a strong drink. After that, we’d invite you to hit up comments below and tell us how you’d tweak this here smartphone if you suddenly found your way into HTC’s headquarters. Would you have stretched the display a centimeter or two? Changed the hardware design somewhat? Made it available with a GSM radio? The options are pretty limitless, so head on down and publish your $0.02. Seriously, what are you waiting for?

How would you change HTC’s Droid Incredible? originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 12 Jun 2010 00:37:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Dear AT&T, your new data plans suck.

Saturday, June 5th, 2010

att_logo

AT&T’s new data plans certainly have gotten their fair share of press over the last couple days. There are two articles in particular that got us thinking, and we would like to throw our two cents into the ring. So here are our thoughts: AT&T, your improved data plans suck. Hit the jump for the rest of our rant.

It’s not because there is a lower data cap on the new plans… we can get our heads around that. We don’t like it, but we understand it — unfortunately, it is the way things are moving. However, the way in which AT&T is going to charge smartphone users for the data they use is just dismal. The fact that using 2 GB of data while signed up for the 200 MB Data Plus plan will result in a bill of $150, while using 2 GB with the Data Pro plan will only total $25 is infuriating…and a mathematical/accounting anomaly. Reuters reporter, Felix Salmon, asked AT&T’s executive director of media relations, Mark Siegel:

F.S.: “Is there any point at which AT&T will help a brother out and automatically switch a heavy data user from Data Plus to Data Pro.”

M.S.: “No.”

So lets review the math…

New AT&T Data Plan

Siegel went onto say, “One of the things we found is that people don’t want one plan. They don’t want one size that fits all.” Which we totally agree with, but when your options are 200 MB (for people who have a smartphone but probably shouldn’t) and 2 GB (which will work for most, but certainly not high end users streaming video and/or tethering), you’re being disingenuous. How about these for options: 200 MB for $15/month (for most BlackBerry users and people who have a smartphone and don’t know what to do with it), $20/month for 1 GB/month (good for most), and $30 for 5/GB (for the high end data hog). There. That wasn’t so hard, was it? Also… as Gizmodo pointed out, if you are going to nickle and dime us on data charges (and text messages, don’t think we forgot about that), how about some roll over megabytes? So AT&T, we bid you good luck putting a positive PR spin on this one, because to be perfectly honest, there isn’t one.

Read [Reuters] Read [Gizmodo]

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How would you change Sony Ericsson’s Xperia X10?

Friday, June 4th, 2010

You may not agree with Sony Ericsson’s time table, nor their decision on what flavor of Android to use, but let’s face it: you were intrigued when SE told you the Xperia X10 would be its first Google-fied smartphone. To date, the X10 has yet to gain the kind of global appreciation shared by the Motorola Droid, Nexus One or iPhone, but that’s not to say quite a few of you haven’t ended up with one. We had our fair share of gripes and grins when reviewing the thing, but as you well know, this is no place for us to rehash what we’ve already explained. Rather, we’re curious to know how exactly you feel about the Xperia X10. In what can only be described as the most competitive smartphone landscape in the history of the world, the X10 is going up against some huge players; do you feel that the product SE has delivered is up to snuff? Would you have rather seen a different version of Android from the start? Any issues with the touch panel, camera, or industrial design? Digging those hard buttons below the display? We have to imaging that the X11 is already floating around in someone’s mind, and chances are high that they’ll be looking in comments for advice on where to turn. No pressure.

How would you change Sony Ericsson’s Xperia X10? originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 04 Jun 2010 23:03:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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