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Posts Tagged ‘Federal Communications Commission’

Google Staff Knew All Along About the Street View Data Breach [Google]

Monday, April 30th, 2012

A report issued by the Federal Communications Commission reveals that the Google engineer responsible for collecting private information via wireless networks from Street View cars repeatedly told his colleagues about the controversial nature of what was happening. More »


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Google Staff Knew All Along About the Street View Data Breach [Google]

Monday, April 30th, 2012

A report issued by the Federal Communications Commission reveals that the Google engineer responsible for collecting private information via wireless networks from Street View cars repeatedly told his colleagues about the controversial nature of what was happening. More »


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FCC fines T-Mobile $819,000 over accessibility issues

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

The Federal Communications Commission on Monday determined that T-Mobile must pay a fine of $819,000 for “willfully and repeatedly” failing to comply with rules regarding hearing-aid compatible handsets. According to the FCC, the carrier violated the rules during 2009 and 2010. The Hearing Aid Compatibility Order requires each carrier to have at least 10 handsets, or 50% of all devices, that support acoustic coupling and 7 phones, or 33% of all devices, with inductive coupling. T-Mobile may reduce or negate the proposed fine by proving to the FCC that it did not violate the rule, or that it didn’t violate it as severely as the FCC alleges.

[Via PhoneScoop]

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FCC fines Google $25,000 for unauthorized data collection and impeding investigation

Monday, April 16th, 2012

The Federal Communications Commission has fined Google $25,000 for impeding a U.S. investigation into the data collection scandal surrounding its Street View project, in which the Internet giant allegedly accessed unsecured networks and collected personal information without users’ permission. The FCC said the Mountain View-based company did not cooperate with the investigation and refused to reveal the names of its engineers associated with the project. “Google refused to identify any employees or produce any e-mails. The company could not supply compliant declarations without identifying employees it preferred not to identify,” the FCC said. “Misconduct of this nature threatens to compromise the commission’s ability to effectively investigate possible violations of the Communications Act and the commission’s rules.”

In a statement provided to Reuters, Google challenged the agency’s findings and claimed it turned over the proper information. ”As the FCC notes in their report, we provided all the materials the regulators felt they needed to conclude their investigation and we were not found to have violated any laws,” the company said. “We disagree with the FCC’s characterization of our cooperation in their investigation and will be filing a response.”

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U.S. carriers partner with FCC to track stolen cell phones

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

The four major wireless providers in the United States have partnered with the Federal Communications Commission in an effort to curb cell phone theft, The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday. The wireless companies will build a central database of stolen cell phones, which will track phones that are reported as lost or stolen and deny them voice and data service. The goal of the database is to reduce crime by making it very difficult to use a stolen device. Verizon Wireless and Sprint currently block phones that are reported stolen from being reactivated. AT&T and T-Mobile do not, although all four carriers have now agreed to be part of the new database. Members of Congress are also expected to propose legislation to make it a crime to alter a cell phone’s unique identification number, according to the report. Similar stolen-phone databases are already in place in the U.K., Germany, France and Australia. While crime hasn’t completely stopped, the number of incidents has apparently declined. Carriers will roll out individual databases within six months that will be centralized over a 12-month period, with smaller regional wireless providers expected to join the database over the next two years.

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Unannounced LG Windows Phone for Sprint revealed by FCC

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

The Federal Communications Commission recently published documents that reveal information about an unannounced Windows Phone device from LG. According to the documents, the LG LS831 supports CDMA in the 800 MHz and 1900 MHz bands, indicating that the handset will land on Sprint’s 3G network. Images reveal that the smartphone features a 5-megapixel rear camera, a front-facing camera, a headphone jack and a microUSB port. Sprint hasn’t launched a Windows Phone device since the HTC Arrive was released in early 2011, however the carrier is rumored to be prepping an LTE-equipped Windows Phone for a fall launch.

[Via Phonescoop]

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FCC Fridays: March 23, 2012

Friday, March 23rd, 2012
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We here at Engadget tend to spend a lot of way too much time poring over the latest FCC filings, be it on the net or directly on the ol’ Federal Communications Commission’s site. Since we couldn’t possibly (want to) cover all the stuff that goes down there individually, we’ve gathered up an exhaustive listing of every phone and / or tablet getting the stamp of approval over the last week. Enjoy!

Continue reading FCC Fridays: March 23, 2012

FCC Fridays: March 23, 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 23 Mar 2012 19:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Verizon explains locked bootloader stance in letter to FCC

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

In a response to the FCC following a formal complaint, Verizon Wireless has outlined the company’s policy on locked bootloaders. An irate Droid-Life reader became fed up with the carrier’s consistent locking of bootloaders on its flagship devices and decided to file a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission. The reader claimed Verizon’s policy was in violation of the “Block C license,” an agreement the company made when it purchased its 700MHz LTE spectrum. Within the agreement, it is stated that Verizon should not be allowed to “lock a phone,” which many interpreted as a statement that should include a phone’s bootloader. Read on for more and a copy of Verizon’s letter.

Verizon claims that it “has established a standard of excellence in customer experience with our branded devices” and “an open bootloader could prevent Verizon Wireless from providing the same level of customer experience and support because it would allow users to change the phone or otherwise modify the software and potentially, negatively impact how the phone connects with the network.” The carrier’s policy is to provide the best solution “for as many customers as possible” and as we’ve suggested, most consumers likely don’t care about rooting, ROMs or the concept of being “open.” They just want a sleek smartphone that works.

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T-Mobile asks FCC to block Verizon spectrum deal

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

T-Mobile is urging federal regulators to block Verizon’s planned spectrum acquisition from SpectrumCo, a joint venture formed by Comcast, Time Warner and Bright House Networks. Verizon’s pending purchase could be worth $3.9 billion and would help the company build out its nationwide LTE network. In a filing late Tuesday, T-Mobile said the Federal Communications Commission should block the deal because it would place an “excessive concentration” of wireless spectrum in Verizon’s hands, reports the Associated Press. The AWS bands that Verizon is looking to acquire uses the same frequencies that T-Mobile uses for its HSPA+ network. T-Mobile claims that the nation’s No.1 carrier already has a large amount of spectrum and does not need any more, and T-Mobile can “quickly, more intensively, and more efficiently” put the spectrum to use compared to Verizon. MetroPCS, the nation’s fifth-largest wireless provider, also urged the FCC to block the deal, claiming both parties had not provided enough information to prove that the acquisition is in the public’s best interest. Verizon and SpectrumCo hope to close the deal by the middle of this year.

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FCC Fridays: February 10, 2012

Friday, February 10th, 2012

We here at Engadget tend to spend a lot of way too much time poring over the latest FCC filings, be it on the net or directly on the ol’ Federal Communications Commission’s site. Since we couldn’t possibly (want to) cover all the stuff that goes down there individually, we’ve gathered up an exhaustive listing of every phone and / or tablet getting the stamp of approval over the last week. Enjoy!

Continue reading FCC Fridays: February 10, 2012

FCC Fridays: February 10, 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 10 Feb 2012 19:45:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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FCC Fridays: February 10, 2012

Friday, February 10th, 2012

We here at Engadget tend to spend a lot of way too much time poring over the latest FCC filings, be it on the net or directly on the ol’ Federal Communications Commission’s site. Since we couldn’t possibly (want to) cover all the stuff that goes down there individually, we’ve gathered up an exhaustive listing of every phone and / or tablet getting the stamp of approval over the last week. Enjoy!

Continue reading FCC Fridays: February 10, 2012

FCC Fridays: February 10, 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 10 Feb 2012 19:45:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012

Friday, January 27th, 2012
FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012
We here at Engadget tend to spend a lot of way too much time poring over the latest FCC filings, be it on the net or directly on the ol’ Federal Communications Commission’s site. Since we couldn’t possibly (want to) cover all the stuff that goes down there, we’ve gathered up an exhaustive listing of every phone and / or tablet getting the stamp of approval over the last week. Enjoy!

Continue reading FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012

FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 27 Jan 2012 18:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012

Friday, January 27th, 2012
FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012
We here at Engadget tend to spend a lot of way too much time poring over the latest FCC filings, be it on the net or directly on the ol’ Federal Communications Commission’s site. Since we couldn’t possibly (want to) cover all the stuff that goes down there, we’ve gathered up an exhaustive listing of every phone and / or tablet getting the stamp of approval over the last week. Enjoy!

Continue reading FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012

FCC Fridays: January 27, 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 27 Jan 2012 18:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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FCC Fridays: January 20, 2012

Friday, January 20th, 2012
We here at Engadget tend to spend a lot of way too much time poring over the latest FCC filings, be it on the net or directly on the ol’ Federal Communications Commission’s site. Since we couldn’t possibly (want to) cover all the stuff that goes down there, we’ve gathered up an exhaustive listing of every phone and / or tablet getting the stamp of approval over the last week. Enjoy!

Continue reading FCC Fridays: January 20, 2012

FCC Fridays: January 20, 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 20 Jan 2012 23:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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LightSquared names Marc Montagner Chief Financial Officer

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

LightSquared announced on Tuesday that it has named Marc Montagner as Chief Financial Officer. Montagner replaces Michael Montemarano, who left the firm in November. Montagner specializes in mergers and acquisitions, having previously worked for Dupont Circle Partners and Sprint Nextel Corporation. LightSquared is looking to build its network on 1600MHz frequency spectrum and deploy a 4G LTE network that Sprint is planning to use in part to accelerate its own LTE roll-out. LightSquared’s network has yet gain approval from  the Federal Communications Commission, however, which recently issued a report stating that the company’s network still interferes with GPS technology. LightSquared promptly replied to the new report and demanded approval, claiming that any interference with GPS devices is caused by GPS signals partially transmitting on LightSquared’s spectrum. Sprint recently granted LightSquared an additional 30 day to gain approval before its pending deal may be canceled. Read more for a full copy of the press release.

LightSquared Names Marc Montagner Chief Financial Officer


RESTON, Va., January 3, 2011 - LightSquared, a wholesale carrier building a nationwide wireless broadband network that will create consumer choice and drive industry innovation, today announced the appointment of telecommunications veteran Marc Montagner as chief financial officer.

In this role, Montagner will report to Sanjiv Ahuja, LightSquared’s chairman and chief executive officer, and will be responsible for the company’s daily financial operations and will oversee investor and bondholder relations.

Montagner will also leverage his experience as executive vice president, sales, marketing and strategy for SkyTerra, LightSquared’s predecessor company, where he worked on the regulatory, technical and business issues associated with re-purposing SkyTerra’s satellite spectrum for terrestrial use. His nearly 25 years of experience also includes working for companies such as France Telecom, Morgan Stanley, Sprint Nextel and Banc of America Securities.

“Marc brings with him deep experience in financial and corporate development for the wireless communications sector, as well as extensive knowledge of LightSquared, and we’re thrilled that he will be joining our management team,” said Ahuja. “His proven track record will be tremendously helpful as we advance our plan to bring world-class wireless broadband service to 260 million Americans.”

Prior to joining LightSquared, in addition to his role at SkyTerra, Montagner was managing partner of Dupont Circle Partners, a mergers and acquisitions advisory firm specializing in the media, technology and telecommunications industries. Previously, he was managing director and co-head of the Global Telecom, Media and Technology Merger and Acquisition Group of Banc of America Securities where he advised a number of companies during acquisitions.

Montagner was also senior vice president, corporate development and mergers and acquisitions for Sprint Nextel Corporation, where he was responsible for all M&A activities for the company, including the $70 billion merger between Sprint and Nextel. Prior to Sprint Nextel, Montagner was a managing director in the Telecom and Media Group at Morgan Stanley. Montagner started his career in the telecom industry at France Telecom.

“I’m looking forward to harnessing my experience in finance and corporate development as LightSquared aims to revolutionize the wireless landscape,” said Montagner. “With more than 30 wholesale customer agreements in place, and even more to come, the company is on the way to fulfilling its vision of high-speed wireless connectivity for all, and I’m proud to help LightSquared achieve that goal.”

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FCC Fridays: December 23, 2011

Friday, December 23rd, 2011
We here at Engadget tend to spend a lot of way too much time poring over the latest FCC filings, be it on the net or directly on the ol’ Federal Communications Commission’s site. Since we couldn’t possibly (want to) cover all the stuff that goes down there, we’ve gathered up an exhaustive listing of every phone and / or tablet getting the stamp of approval over the last week. Enjoy!

Continue reading FCC Fridays: December 23, 2011

FCC Fridays: December 23, 2011 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 23 Dec 2011 10:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Public policy groups accuse AT&T of merger ‘gamesmanship,’ call for release of FCC docs

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

Putting it simply, AT&T’s planned purchase of T-Mobile USA is beginning to sound like a game of chess (with a sprinkle of politics, of course). Public Knowledge and Media Access Project requested Tuesday that the Federal Communications Commission release documents related to AT&T’s planned $39 billion acquisition of T-Mobile USA. The two public policy groups argue that “the public deserves for the Commission’s determinations to see the light of day.” AT&T recently withdrew its acquisition application from the FCC to focus on a lawsuit brought against the merger by the Department of Justice. The organizations believe AT&T pulled its application so that it can “seek a favorable decision” in federal court and then use that ruling to win the FCC’s approval. Read on for more.

Despite that viewpoint, there are several experts who believe AT&T will have to put everything on the table to win its case against the Justice Department, and a recent report suggested AT&T will offer to divest 40% of T-Mobile USA in an effort to win its case against the DOJ.

“This type of litigation gamesmanship wastes the resources of both the Commission and the federal court system,” Media Access Project and Public Knowledge said in a joint statement on Tuesday. “The Commission’s application dismissal rules are not designed to indulge this kind of behavior, and the Commission is well within its authority to protect the integrity of its procedures, deny the request, and move forward with its evidentiary investigation.”

The two groups argued that AT&T is “exhausting” limited resources and said it would be against public interest for AT&T to re-file with the FCC after its opponents, such as Sprint, have already spent valuable resources trying to fight the deal. The full joint press release follows below.

Public Knowledge and Media Access Project Accuse AT&T Of ‘Gamesmanship’ On Merger Application; Call For Release of FCC Order

November 28, 2011

Public Knowledge (PK) and Media Access Project (MAP) said today that AT&T and T-Mobile were engaging in “litigation gamesmanship” in the companies’ attempt to withdraw their merger application from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

In a filing with the FCC, the groups also said that the Commission’s order designating the transaction for a formal hearing should be released because “the public deserves for the Commission’s determinations to see the light of day.”

The filing is here.

The companies have said they have said the FCC has no authority to act on their withdrawal.  PK and MAP disagree.

The companies have said publicly they aren’t withdrawing their application because they are reconfiguring their business deal, but “rather because they intend to seek a favorable decision in federal court, which the companies can then use to pressure the Commission to approve the merge,” according to the filing from PK and MAP.

The groups added:  “This type of litigation gamesmanship wastes the resources of both the Commission and the federal court system. The Commission’s application dismissal rules are not designed to indulge this kind of behavior, and the Commission is well within its authority to protect the integrity of its procedures, deny the request, and move forward with its evidentiary investigation.”

“AT&T must not be allowed to triumph through use of its bottomless war chest when the facts are so clearly against it. To allow AT&T to exhaust the far more limited resources of public interest opponents by withdrawing the application at the end of the process, only so that it can refile under more favorable conditions after its opponents have spent their resources, is clearly contrary to the public interest,” PK and MAP said.

FCC rules not only allow the Commission wide latitude to determine what to do with the withdrawal application, they also allow the Commission to make public the voluminous order setting the takeover for a formal evidentiary hearing, PK and MAP said. They suggested that the Commission could issue an order releasing the FCC’s study of market conditions contained in the hearing order while at the same time requiring any future merger filings at the FCC from the companies be automatically designated for hearing while incorporating all of the evidence already filed.

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