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Posts Tagged ‘Game Consoles’

DirecTV drops NFL Sunday Ticket price for current subscribers

Thursday, April 19th, 2012

DirecTV drops NFL Sunday Ticket price for current subscribers

After raising the price of its NFL Sunday Ticket package last season, this year DirecTV is dropping it back down for current subscribers, to just $199. Of course, most of the impetus for the price drop is probably because so many current subs are people who signed up for the service last season with Sunday Ticket as a freebie, but we’re sure regular customers will gladly keep the cash in their pockets. Another change for the 2012 season is the NFL Sunday Ticket Max package, which includes all the extras of SuperFan and To-Go (RedZone Channel, streaming to iOS and Android mobile devices, Short Cuts, VOD highlights, etc.) extras as a part of the bundle for an extra $100 to existing customers, or for $299.95. There’s no word on any additional game consoles or internet only packages yet, but at least with the lockout a distant memory, football fans have all offseason to decide if they want to shell out for it.

Continue reading DirecTV drops NFL Sunday Ticket price for current subscribers

DirecTV drops NFL Sunday Ticket price for current subscribers originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 19 Apr 2012 23:31:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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GeChic On-Lap 1302 is a ‘Secret Tool’ to give your smartphone dual screens (video)

Saturday, March 17th, 2012
GeChic On-Lap 1302 is a 'Secret Tool' to give your smartphone dual screens (video)

If you’ve ever felt the burning urge to mirror your smartphone’s display onto a larger screen, then you might consider stuffing GeChic’s portable, 13.3-inch monitor into the ol’ man purse for your next wayward outing. We’re not promising that it’ll be simple, but in addition to supporting laptops, game consoles and digital cameras, you can also rig up your smartphone to the On-Lap 1302 monitor — with the assistance of a tangle of adapters, batteries and cords, that is. The product is said to be just 8mm thick, but most importantly, this 1366 x 768 display can be powered either from your laptop’s USB port or an external battery pack. It includes proper hookups for VGA and HDMI video connections (via a proprietary 30-pin connector), but laptop users may also purchase a Mini DisplayPort accessory. Throw in Apple’s Digital AV Adapter or an MHL to HDMI solution, and boom, you’ve also got support for your iPhone and many Android smartphones. Okay, so it’s a bit convoluted, but the product’s video touts this as, “The best idea ever,” and along with its homespun production, we think you’ll enjoy it for a good laugh — so just hop the break. Those interested in such gear will find it on Newegg next month for $199.

Continue reading GeChic On-Lap 1302 is a ‘Secret Tool’ to give your smartphone dual screens (video)

GeChic On-Lap 1302 is a ‘Secret Tool’ to give your smartphone dual screens (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 17 Mar 2012 03:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGeChic, Newegg  | Email this | Comments

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Nielsen: 56% of U.S. households own a current video game console

Saturday, March 10th, 2012

Over the last year, the total time spent playing video games increased 7% and purchases of digital content and subscriptions rose 8% according to a study from Nielsen. Over half of all households, 56%, owned at least one current-generation gaming console as of January 2012, an increase from 50% in 2011. Mobile, handheld and tablet gaming continues to grow as well, with 66% of households with kids between 6 and 12 years old owning a Nintendo DS or Sony PSP, while also owning an iOS device. More adults ages 25 through 34 play games on Android devices than on iOS devices, but iOS gaming is evenly distributed across the various age groups covered by the study. As for next-generation game consoles, four out of five gamers who own current-generation systems are interested in a future console.

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Nielsen’s 2011 media usage report: conventional TV still rules, but online viewing is skyrocketing

Saturday, January 7th, 2012

2011′s come and gone, but Nielsen’s media report on the year remains. The latest figures from the year that was have been published, and conventional television is still riding a wave of popularity. We’re told that 290 million Statesiders are still ogling at least one television, with around one in three American homes (35.9 million for the mathematicians) owning four or more of the things. Across the wire, some 211 million Americans are online, with a staggering 116 million aged 13 and up accessing the mobile web. Other figures include 253 million DVD players owned, 162 million game consoles, 129 million DVRs and 95 million satellite subscribers. There’s also some 111 million people watching timeshifted programming, and Netflix itself has four times the average viewing time per person, per month compared to the boob tube. Concerned about mobile? Android’s US market share (again, according to Nielsen) is pegged at 43 percent, while the iPhone has 28 percent and RIM’s BlackBerry OS claims 18 percent. Hit up the links below for more charts, numbers and things that your grandmother couldn’t possibly care less about.

Nielsen’s 2011 media usage report: conventional TV still rules, but online viewing is skyrocketing originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 07 Jan 2012 22:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink The Verge  |  sourceNielsen  | Email this | Comments

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Engadget Primed: ports, connectors and the future of your TV’s backside

Friday, December 23rd, 2011

Primed goes in-depth on the technobabble you hear on Engadget every day — we dig deep into each topic’s history and how it benefits our lives. You can follow the series here. Looking to suggest a piece of technology for us to break down? Drop us a line at primed *at* engadget *dawt* com.

For many among us, what goes on behind and along the sides of a high-definition television is almost as compelling as what’s displayed on that big, beautiful flat screen. Of course, we’re talking connectors, with their attendant chaos of cords. A high-def TV is only as good as its connection to a high-def signal. The same holds true for the array of disc players, game consoles and other peripherals we cluster around our sets. So it may seem quaint, then, that we still often confront more analog ports than digital ones on our high-end TVs. You’d think with advances in wireless technology, we’d have done away with the spider web of wires entirely. Alas, like flying cars and fembots, we’re just not there yet.

In this installment of Primed, we’ll examine the best and the bogus when it comes to TV connectors, and spend some time tracing the arc of how we got to where we are in this particular moment of television evolution. The narrative on television and home entertainment remains a work in progress. But we’ll endeavor to get you caught up to date, and as an added bonus offer a glimpse of what the future of your TV’s backside will likely look like.

Continue reading Engadget Primed: ports, connectors and the future of your TV’s backside

Engadget Primed: ports, connectors and the future of your TV’s backside originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 23 Dec 2011 15:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Siri talks to Mac 512k, plays telephone with intermediary computers

Monday, November 7th, 2011

Possibly fueled by the same geeky instinct that pushes our kind to build SD card readers for ancient game consoles and port Doom to just about everything, YouTube user Napabar recently bridged the 27 year gap between the Macintosh 512k and the iPhone 4S. That’s right, Siri and the Fat Mac are talking. Sort of. Most of the heavy lifting is being done by a pair of intermediary machines, an iMac that’s been configured to run an AppleScript upon receipt of a Siri dictated email, and a bridge computer that passes on the resulting text file to the Mac 512K’s floppy drive. Result? Dictate an email to Siri, get a text file with its contents on the Mac 512k. Old and new technology, talking like old pen-pals. And to think, all it took was two middlemen.

Siri talks to Mac 512k, plays telephone with intermediary computers originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 Nov 2011 01:37:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Daring Fireball  |  sourceNapabar (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

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We have entered a post-PC era, report claims [infographic]

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

North Americans have officially embraced the “post-PC era” according to a new report from broadband solutions provider Sandvine. The company’s Global Internet Phenomena Report for Fall 2011 analyzes user behavior on the Internet to identify trends, and the trend in several key areas is quickly moving away from traditional personal computers. For the first time, more real-time home entertainment was delivered to devices like gaming consoles, smartphones and tablets in the United States than to PCs. ”[We have] entered a post-PC era, in which the majority of Real-Time Entertainment traffic on North America’s fixed access networks is destined for devices other than a laptop or desktop computer,” Sandvine said in its report. “Game consoles, settop boxes, smart TVs, tablets, and mobile devices being used within the home combine to receive 55% of all Real-Time Entertainment traffic.” An infographic highlighting key data from Sandvine’s report follows below.


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Time Warner CEO talks HBO Go expansion, first UltraViolet digital locker-enabled movies

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

The second quarter 2011 results for Time Warner came out today and while news of a successful quarter intrigues investors, we’re keying in on the always chatty CEO Jeff Bewkes‘ comments about new technology including HBO Go, UltraViolet and even Netflix. After a successful launch for HBO Go on mobile devices with more than four million downloads, it will expand to Brazil and Mexico by the end of the year and Asia next year while also streaming to more connected TVs and game consoles. Another platform getting some love is the long awaited “digital lockerUltraViolet (Listen to our podcast with the man in charge for more background), which will be included on the Blu-ray releases of Green Lantern and Horrible Bosses later this year and fully integrated with recent purchase Flixster; we’ll finally find out if buy once, play anywhere is really as good as it sounds. Oh, and that Albanian army Netflix? Bewkes may be warming up to it — and the impressive profits posted by CBS after its new streaming deals — so while HBO is probably still off of the table for streaming there may be other TV content from its library on the way in return for a fat licensing check.

Time Warner CEO talks HBO Go expansion, first UltraViolet digital locker-enabled movies originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 03 Aug 2011 15:38:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Touchscreen module revenues to hit $13.4 billion this year on tablet, smartphone demand

Friday, July 15th, 2011

According to research firm DisplaySearch, revenues from touchscreen modules will hit $13.4 billion this year. Projected capacitive screens have seen the largest growth since Apple made them popular on the iPhone in 2007, and DisplaySearch expects capacitive displays to account for 70% of all touchscreen revenues this year. Capacitive display shipments are also expected to jump more than 100% year-over-year. The company said the greatest display growth was in the tablet PC industry, where 26 million touchscreen modules were shipped last year. That figure is expected to jump to 72 million units this year and to more than 100 million units in 2012. ”Touch screen penetration has rapidly increased in mobile phones, handheld games, game consoles, and tablet PC applications, which collectively will account for more than $10.5 billion in touch screen revenues this year,” said Jennifer Colegrove, PhD, vice president of emerging display technologies at DisplaySearch. “In addition, we see strong touchscreen growth over the next several years driven by demand in larger display applications such as all-in-one PCs, notebooks PCs, and consumer gaming.” Read on for the full press release.

Touch Panel Demand Soars; 2011 Revenues to Grow by 90% Y/Y

Growth in Mobile Phones, Tablet PCs, and Portable Gaming Driving the Industry, as Capacitive Overtakes Resistive in Revenues

Santa Clara, CALIF., July 12, 2011—In the recently released Touch Panel Market Analysis, DisplaySearch reported that total touch screen module revenue will reach $13.4 billion in 2011, and nearly double in six years, reaching $23.9 billion by 2017.

“Touch screen penetration has rapidly increased in mobile phones, handheld games, game consoles, and tablet PC applications, which collectively will account for more than $10.5 billion in touch screen revenues this year,” noted Jennifer Colegrove, PhD, Vice President of Emerging Display Technologies at DisplaySearch.“In addition, we see strong touch screen growth over the next several years driven by demand in larger display applications such as all-in-one PCs, notebook PCs, and consumer gaming.”

Projected Capacitive Increasingly Becoming the Dominant Touch Technology

As DisplaySearch previously forecasted, projected capacitive became the leading touch screen technology in terms of revenue in 2010. Projected capacitive growth has been explosive since being popularized by Apple in 2007, and many tablet PCs manufacturers have adopted it. In 2011, projected capacitive shipments are expected to grow by more than 100% Y/Y, and will account for 70% of all touch screen revenues. In addition to dedicated touch screen suppliers moving into projected capacitive, several color filter suppliers and LCD manufacturers have converted lines to produce it. In fact, over 60 companies are supplying projected capacitive in 2011.

Shipments for in-cell touch, which first came to market in 2009, didn’t materialize in 2010. However, in-cell touch is expected to take off in 2012 as yield rates improve. On-cell touch, meanwhile, has seen greater adoption, but the mix has shifted to smaller screen sizes used in mobile phones and digital still cameras, whereas it has had difficulty competing with projected capacitive in tablet PC applications. Other touch technologies are experiencing market growth, such as combination-type touch panels which offer both pen and finger touch.

Mobile Phone Still the Leading Application, Tablet PCs Gaining Share in 2011

Mobile phones are the major application for touch screens in terms of unit shipments, accounting for two-thirds of units shipped in 2010. DisplaySearch forecasts that 868 million touch screens will ship for mobile phone applications in 2011, up 68% Y/Y.

The tablet PC represents a fast-growing application for touch screens, accounting for 26 million units in 2010. Growth continues to be strong, with DisplaySearch forecasting over 72 million touch screens for tablet PCs in 2011, and over 100 million in 2012. Revenues for projected capacitive touch screens in tablet PCs are expected to grow by more than $1 billion in 2011.

Touch penetration is increasing in consumer gaming devices, including consoles such as Microsoft Kinect, as well as handheld games such as the Nintendo 3DS. Over the next few years, notebook and all-in-one PCs as well as automobile monitors are expected to contribute to touch screen market growth as well. Touch technologies with high transmittance, low power consumption, multi-touch or gesture recognition will benefit the most.

The DisplaySearch Touch Panel Market Analysis report is a comprehensive analysis of the touch panel technologies and their market forecasts through 2017. This report has a detailed breakdown of 22 applications (with tablet PCs application) with 11 touch technology categories and nine size categories. It also has details on touch controller ICs, the sensor market, and an area and multi-touch forecast through 2017.

DisplaySearch surveyed over 190 suppliers of touch screen modules, controller ICs, ITO film, and other components to produce the 2011 Touch Panel Market Analysis report. These firms are profiled in the report, along with 2010 history, shipments, and revenues for over 100 touch screen suppliers.

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Ocosmos O-Bar Smart TV / Google TV controller hands-on at CES 2011

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Ocosmos wasn’t only showing off a new duo of Windows 7 handheld gaming machine here at CES, but also a newfangled remote in its O-Bar line. This guy is an ultraslim Bluetooth remote, designed to control set-top boxes, game consoles and connected HDTVs. Details were a little unclear (to say the least) on how exactly it would all work, but apparently the company’s supremely interested in licensing out the technology underneath of it for use in other remotes. We get the impression that El Goog doesn’t know about that Google TV logo there on the bottom, and folks at the booth noted that this was just a mockup for demonstration purposes. The goal here would be to place a virtual keyboard on the capacitive display, then enabling couch dwellers to bang out searches for shows on their set. For reasons unknown, there are also a pair of shoulder buttons at the top, possibly for embedded games. This one’s expected to ship later in the year for an undisclosed amount, presumably sans the Google branding.

Ocosmos O-Bar Smart TV / Google TV controller hands-on at CES 2011 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 07 Jan 2011 13:33:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sony on pace to sell 15 million PS3 consoles this year

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

Microsoft’s Kinect sensor may have stolen the show this holiday season, but it looks like Sony might have the last laugh. Kazuo Hirai, head of Sony’s games division, sat down with reporters on Wednesday to talk PlayStation. Hirai confirmed that Sony’s PlayStation 3 console sales are currently in line with the company’s expectations. In the fiscal year ending March 31, 2011, Sony is on track to sell 15 million PS3 game consoles — up over 15% from last year’s 13 million consoles. Sony also announced last month that it had sold 4.1 million PlayStation Move controllers in two months. Independent gaming industry monitor VGChartz indicates that Sony has sold 12.4 million PlayStation 3 consoles so far this calendar year, landing it ahead of Microsoft’s Xbox 360 (11.3 million) and behind the Nintendo Wii (15.7 million) and DS (19.2 million).

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Logitech does 5.1 surround sound on a budget with $100 Z506 speakers

Friday, July 16th, 2010

Logitech’s boxed speaker sets have always gone over quite well with reviewers, and now it’s offering a 5.1 system that may just be priced at a point that’s too good to refuse. You know, if you holdouts were considering sticking with that 2.0 setup for another score or so. Launched today, the Surround Sound Speakers Z506 are designed to play nice with PCs, game consoles, PMPs and DVD / Blu-ray players. Pretty much anything that sends out an audio signal can be hooked up to these, and Logi even threw in color coded connectors to prevent you from getting overly confused and eventually doing something awfully regrettable with the satellites. There’s 75 watts of RMS power, which should be plenty to fill your moderately sized gaming cave — head on past the break for a promo vid, if you’re into that type of thing.

Continue reading Logitech does 5.1 surround sound on a budget with $100 Z506 speakers

Logitech does 5.1 surround sound on a budget with $100 Z506 speakers originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 16 Jul 2010 04:38:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceLogitech [1], [2]  | Email this | Comments

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Logitech does 5.1 surround sound on a budget with $100 Z506 speakers

Friday, July 16th, 2010

Logitech’s boxed speaker sets have always gone over quite well with reviewers, and now it’s offering a 5.1 system that may just be priced at a point that’s too good to refuse. You know, if you holdouts were considering sticking with that 2.0 setup for another score or so. Launched today, the Surround Sound Speakers Z506 are designed to play nice with PCs, game consoles, PMPs and DVD / Blu-ray players. Pretty much anything that sends out an audio signal can be hooked up to these, and Logi even threw in color coded connectors to prevent you from getting overly confused and eventually doing something awfully regrettable with the satellites. There’s 75 watts of RMS power, which should be plenty to fill your moderately sized gaming cave — head on past the break for a promo vid, if you’re into that type of thing.

Continue reading Logitech does 5.1 surround sound on a budget with $100 Z506 speakers

Logitech does 5.1 surround sound on a budget with $100 Z506 speakers originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 16 Jul 2010 04:38:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceLogitech [1], [2]  | Email this | Comments

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Sony selling ‘PlayStation Protection Plan’ warranty extension for PS3, PSP

Monday, May 3rd, 2010

Sony makes some pretty resilient game consoles, and while you’ll certainly hear about the occasional glitch, they aren’t exactly plagued with RRoD. That said, there’s always room for worry, and if you’re willing to pay for peace of mind, Sony has a brand-new service agreement with your name on it. Dubbed the “PlayStation Protection Plan,” it simply extends the full warranty on your PlayStation 3 or PSP for another year or two, and optionally covers your handheld’s five-foot swan dive onto solid concrete for an additional fee. While replacement won’t quite be no-questions-asked and the warranty explicitly fails to cover dead pixels, liquid damage and loss of data (among other things), we can still imagine some will pony up the $30 to $50 for extra insurance. Not us, though. Since you can only buy if you’re still within the original warranty period, it won’t help us replace our backwards-compatible 60GB PS3… and honestly, we think we’ve had enough of Sony’s protection.

Sony selling ‘PlayStation Protection Plan’ warranty extension for PS3, PSP originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 03 May 2010 21:27:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Ars Technica  |  sourcePlayStation Protection Plan  | Email this | Comments

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brite-View LinkE pipes content to four Ethernet sources over existing powerline network

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

The market is darn near flooded with HomePlug AV-compatible powerline solutions, but Zinnet has seen fit to one-up the networking mainstays by dishing out a product that serves not one, but four Ethernet-packin’ devices simultaneously. Designed for use with its brite-View CinemaTube (but fully capable of working with game consoles, Blu-ray players and media streamers), this two-piece kit allows internet content to flow through your home’s existing powerline network and hit up to four devices on the other end. Simply plug the solo port adapter into a wall socket beside your router or broadband modem, and the four port adapter in your home theater room (or den, for the simplistic among us). From there, you can connect your Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Roku set-top-box, Blu-ray player, CinemaTube deck or any other AV device that benefits from a wired internet connection; just like that, you’ve got a makeshift connection to four devices, and you’ll never have to worry over WiFi dropouts again. All that’s required to bring this joy into your life is $89.99 and a basic understanding of online checkout procedure, both of which we’re sure you can handle.

brite-View LinkE pipes content to four Ethernet sources over existing powerline network originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 09 Mar 2010 17:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourcePR Newswire  | Email this | Comments

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Rumor: Sony is Developing a Universal Gaming Controller For Use With Xbox and Nintendo Consoles [Sony]

Friday, February 19th, 2010

Sony. Working on a PlayStation controller that can also be used with Xbox 360s. And Nintendo consoles. Has hell iced over? Did the last 30 years never happen? Has Linus Torvalds replaced Kazuo Hirai at SCEI?

I know Sony’s been working through its propriety issues of late, using the ePub format for ereaders and—heaven forbid!—launching its first range of SD cards. But opening the PlayStation up so the controller can be used with rival game consoles? Well I never.

GoRumors has dug up a patent suggesting Sony’s working on a controller with a touchscreen LCD panel that would display commands for other consoles or players that have been set up to work with it.

The patent spells it out:

“A game console controller includes a hand-holdable housing and a touch sensitive liquid crystal display (LCD) on the housing. The LCD is caused to present, depending on what type of game console a user has selected, a controller key layout for a first type of game console or a controller key layout for a second type of game console. A key layout includes plural keys selectable by a user to input commands to a game console.”

By the looks of the diagram, the controller wouldn’t just be a remote control that would let you turn on the different consoles—it would be an actual gaming peripheral, with the X/Y A/B buttons displayed on the LCD. It certainly wouldn’t replace the use of an Xbox 360 or Wii controller, as I can’t imagine mashing my thumbs on a touchscreen display for too long, but could be handy when you’ve got extra friends around and not enough pads to go around. Or as I mentioned before, turning the consoles on to access media.

I’m just in a state of shock that Sony of all companies is proposing this idea. I need to go lie down for a while. [GoRumorsThanks Anand!]


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Whatever You Do This Christmas, Don’t Buy a Japanese Child a Console [Infographic]

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

PS3? Wii? Xbox 360? If you were to buy any of these systems for a Japanese child this Christmas, they’d be sorely disappointed. Game consoles are the LAST thing on their list—literally. So what do they want?

According to a recent poll (results above/translation below) of Japanese children 12 and under, they really want…

1. Video game software (over 450 kids said this)
2. Pretty Cure goods (over 100 kids said this)
3. Anpanman goods
4. Books (picture book, book, illustrated encyclopedia)
5. Kamen Rider goods
6. Bicycle
7. Toy car
8. Clothes
9. Stuffed animal
10. Video game console

Since many kids have consoles, they just want video games now—that’s fair. But clothes? What self-respecting child under 13 wants clothes?? And have you actually ever seen a picture of Anpanman?

As translated by the esteemed Brian Ashcraft over at Kotaku. [はちま起稿 via Kotaku]



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