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Google app review video shows Share to ‘Drive’ option

Friday, April 20th, 2012

google drive leaked

To close out each week, the Android Developer Relations team hosts a Friday App Review video. This Friday, however, the focus is far from whatever apps are being showcased (psst… it’s Handy Scanner); instead, all eyes are on the Share to ‘Drive’ option, seen just below the ‘Bluetooth’ logo in the screen capture above. It’s shown at the 32:53 mark in the video just after the break, and while this certainly isn’t confirmation that Goog’s own cloud storage service will be hitting the masses soon, it’s one of the more tangible pieces of evidence that Google Drive is at least a real initiative. Come to think of it, we’ve got a couple of passes to Google I/O 2012, which just so happens to get going in around two months. Anyone else feeling that tug of puzzle pieces coming together?

Continue reading Google app review video shows Share to ‘Drive’ option

Google app review video shows Share to ‘Drive’ option originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 20 Apr 2012 23:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink The Verge  |  sourceAndroid Developers (YouTube)  | Email this | Comments

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Google Drive SDK, Gmail integration hinted at in Google Docs source code

Friday, February 24th, 2012

Still wondering if Mountain View’s Google Drive service will launch as a Google Docs rebranding? The folks at the Google Operating System blog have some code you might want to peek at, then. Apparently the Docs’ source code mentions an SDK connected to the upcoming Google Drive, opening the door for third party app support. The code hints at deeper Gmail integration too, “Say goodbye to email attachments and hello to real time collaboration,” it says, “Drag anything shared with you to My Drive for easy access.” If Drive turns out to be more than a hefty Docs update, at the very least it seems clear that the new service will play nice with El Goog’s other web apps — after all, isn’t that what that consolidated privacy policy is supposed to be about?

Google Drive SDK, Gmail integration hinted at in Google Docs source code originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 24 Feb 2012 23:50:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGoogle Operating System  | Email this | Comments

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Google Screenwise panel will pay you to track your every move online

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012
Don’t mind letting Google watch your every click while browsing the web? Awesome, because the folks in Mountain View want to pay you for letting them do just that. The company is recruiting panelists for a project it’s calling Screenwise, a program that will give the internet behemoth more insight into how the general public uses the interwebs day in and day out. Once you opt in, you’ll receive a $5 gift card code to Amazon and for up to a year, you’ll get additional spending money every three months. But how will The Goog track your mouse clicks? Just before getting paid, you’ll have to download a browser extension that will keep an eye on things and send your data back to the mothership. If you’re looking to make a little more dough, Ars Technica reports that you’ll be able to opt for a more lucrative hardware monitoring option. Here, you’ll have to install the Screenwise Data Collector (pictured above) on your home network; however, the pay out is an initial Benjamin and $20 for every month you participate. Sound like something you’d want in on? Hit the source link below to be notified when registration opens.

Google Screenwise panel will pay you to track your every move online originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 08 Feb 2012 17:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink TechCrunch  |  sourceGoogle, Ars Technica  | Email this | Comments

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Stat Alert: More connected phones than computers in key markets, says Google

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

There are obvious stats, bizarre ones, and then the good old informative ones. New data from Google revealed by Ad Age, falls into the latter category. According to Goog’s numbers, more people have a mobile internet-capable device than a PC or laptop in the five key markets it tested (US, UK, Germany, France and Japan). In the US, this figure is nearly 10% more, some 76% against 68%. The numbers were taken in September and October last year, which means any impact Christmas may have had won’t be taken into account. The trend away from featurephones towards smartphones is also drilled home, but that won’t be news to many people ’round these parts. No matter how you connect these days, any savvy netizen will tell you: it’s quality, not quantity that counts anyway.

Stat Alert: More connected phones than computers in key markets, says Google originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 25 Jan 2012 09:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Textually  |  sourceAdage  | Email this | Comments

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Sterne Agee: RIM still a solid acquisition target, but only at a discount

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Struggling smartphone vendor Research In Motion is still a solid takeover target according to a new report, but only at a deep discount below RIM’s already low market value. RIM has lost 75% of its value over the past year but Sterne Agee analyst Shaw Wu says RIM’s true value lies below its current market capitalization, which sits at approximately $8.7 billion. Logical buyers according to Wu include Samsung — though the company has gone on record instating it is not interested in acquiring RIM — as well as Amazon, Microsoft and maybe even Facebook. Read on for more.

“While we believe there is some intrinsic value in RIMM as an acquisition target with its 75 million subscribers, patent portfolio, BlackBerry OS, and push network, we are unsure if a price of over $10 billion makes sense,” Wu wrote in a note to investors on Wednesday. “Currently, the company has a market capitalization of $9.2 billion, meaning upside could be limited.”

Breaking down RIM’s worth to potential buyers, the analyst sees $5 billion to $7 billion in real value, or between $9 and $13 per share. “We believe its most valuable assets are arguably its patent portfolio and BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) app,” Wu wrote. “We estimate its patent portfolio could be worth $2-$3 billion assuming the prices that an AAPL led team paid (which RIMM was part of) for Nortel assets and GOOG for MMI. For BBM with its 45 million users, we estimate it could be worth $2-$3 billion.”

Wu continued, noting that RIM’s push network and BlackBerry OS likely wouldn’t have much value in a market dominated by Google and Apple. “We believe the value of its push network and BlackBerry OS are more questionable given competitive issues both have had in the marketplace but nonetheless, we assign a value of $1 billion (the price paid for PALM). This gives us a valuation of $5-$7 billion, meaning a stock price of $9-$13, which is a bit below where it is currently trading.”

Sterne Agee reiterated its Neutral rating on RIM stock with no price target.

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Sterne Agee: RIM still a solid acquisition target, but only at a discount

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Struggling smartphone vendor Research In Motion is still a solid takeover target according to a new report, but only at a deep discount below RIM’s already low market value. RIM has lost 75% of its value over the past year but Sterne Agee analyst Shaw Wu says RIM’s true value lies below its current market capitalization, which sits at approximately $8.7 billion. Logical buyers according to Wu include Samsung — though the company has gone on record instating it is not interested in acquiring RIM — as well as Amazon, Microsoft and maybe even Facebook. Read on for more.

“While we believe there is some intrinsic value in RIMM as an acquisition target with its 75 million subscribers, patent portfolio, BlackBerry OS, and push network, we are unsure if a price of over $10 billion makes sense,” Wu wrote in a note to investors on Wednesday. “Currently, the company has a market capitalization of $9.2 billion, meaning upside could be limited.”

Breaking down RIM’s worth to potential buyers, the analyst sees $5 billion to $7 billion in real value, or between $9 and $13 per share. “We believe its most valuable assets are arguably its patent portfolio and BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) app,” Wu wrote. “We estimate its patent portfolio could be worth $2-$3 billion assuming the prices that an AAPL led team paid (which RIMM was part of) for Nortel assets and GOOG for MMI. For BBM with its 45 million users, we estimate it could be worth $2-$3 billion.”

Wu continued, noting that RIM’s push network and BlackBerry OS likely wouldn’t have much value in a market dominated by Google and Apple. “We believe the value of its push network and BlackBerry OS are more questionable given competitive issues both have had in the marketplace but nonetheless, we assign a value of $1 billion (the price paid for PALM). This gives us a valuation of $5-$7 billion, meaning a stock price of $9-$13, which is a bit below where it is currently trading.”

Sterne Agee reiterated its Neutral rating on RIM stock with no price target.

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Google’s Moto Mobility deal may have had Microsoft roots, comes with $2.5 billion break-up fee

Monday, August 15th, 2011

Is Microsoft preparing to fill in Google’s old mobile boots? It could very well be, now that the search king has firmly committed to the hardware side of the mobile business. According to a report on GigaOM, MS was one of many potential suitors circling Motorola’s treasure trove of patents, effectively forcing El Goog to swoop in for the $12.5 billion kill. Moto’s portfolio of 17,000 patents and 7,500 patent applications would have significantly strengthened Redmond’s attack on the Android platform, but it appears the loss might actually benefit MS in other unintended ways. Despite the cheery, public well-wishing from handset makers, insider rumblings indicate a possible mass OEM defection to Windows Phone 7 could shortly be afoot, paving the way for a fierce, three-way mobile OS fight. For its part, Google doesn’t seem too worried about the competition, considering the deal’s hefty $2.5 billion break-up fee — a percentage three times that of the AT&T / T-Mobile merger penalty — a confident financial sign it intends to win this wireless race.

Google’s Moto Mobility deal may have had Microsoft roots, comes with $2.5 billion break-up fee originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 15 Aug 2011 19:13:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink FOSS Patents  |  sourceGigaOM, Bloomberg  | Email this | Comments

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Google to acquire Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion

Monday, August 15th, 2011

Google and Motorola Mobility have announced an agreement whereby Google will acquire Motorola for $12.5 billion. The acquisition price equates to $40 per share of Motorola stock, or a premium of 63% over Friday’s closing price. The move is considered in part to be an effort that will better-align Google to compete with Apple’s iPhone, which owned two-thirds of profits among the world’s top-8 smartphone vendors in the second quarter. A Google-owned hardware arm give the company complete control over device hardware, software and services, resulting in an end-to-end user experience that is completely under Google’s command. Perhaps just as important in this day and age, the deal will also give Google control of Motorola’s extensive patent portfolio. “Motorola Mobility’s total commitment to Android has created a natural fit for our two companies,” Google CEO Larry Page said in a statement. “Together, we will create amazing user experiences that supercharge the entire Android ecosystem for the benefit of consumers, partners and developers. I look forward to welcoming Motorolans to our family of Googlers.” It is unclear how this might affect Google’s relationship with other Android partners. The deal is subject to regulatory approval, of course, and it is expected to close in late 2011 or early 2012. The full press release follows below.

Google to Acquire Motorola Mobility

Combination will Supercharge Android, Enhance Competition, and Offer Wonderful User Experiences

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. & LIBERTYVILLE, Ill.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) and Motorola Mobility Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: MMI) today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Google will acquire Motorola Mobility for $40.00 per share in cash, or a total of about $12.5 billion, a premium of 63% to the closing price of Motorola Mobility shares on Friday, August 12, 2011. The transaction was unanimously approved by the boards of directors of both companies.

“Motorola Mobility’s total commitment to Android has created a natural fit for our two companies. Together, we will create amazing user experiences that supercharge the entire Android ecosystem for the benefit of consumers, partners and developers. I look forward to welcoming Motorolans to our family of Googlers.”

The acquisition of Motorola Mobility, a dedicated Android partner, will enable Google to supercharge the Android ecosystem and will enhance competition in mobile computing. Motorola Mobility will remain a licensee of Android and Android will remain open. Google will run Motorola Mobility as a separate business.

Larry Page, CEO of Google, said, “Motorola Mobility’s total commitment to Android has created a natural fit for our two companies. Together, we will create amazing user experiences that supercharge the entire Android ecosystem for the benefit of consumers, partners and developers. I look forward to welcoming Motorolans to our family of Googlers.”

Sanjay Jha, CEO of Motorola Mobility, said, “This transaction offers significant value for Motorola Mobility’s stockholders and provides compelling new opportunities for our employees, customers, and partners around the world. We have shared a productive partnership with Google to advance the Android platform, and now through this combination we will be able to do even more to innovate and deliver outstanding mobility solutions across our mobile devices and home businesses.”

Andy Rubin, Senior Vice President of Mobile at Google, said, “We expect that this combination will enable us to break new ground for the Android ecosystem. However, our vision for Android is unchanged and Google remains firmly committed to Android as an open platform and a vibrant open source community. We will continue to work with all of our valued Android partners to develop and distribute innovative Android-powered devices.”

The transaction is subject to customary closing conditions, including the receipt of regulatory approvals in the US, the European Union and other jurisdictions, and the approval of Motorola Mobility’s stockholders. The transaction is expected to close by the end of 2011 or early 2012.

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Google’s Music Beta gives users two invites, keys to the cloud for their best mates

Friday, July 29th, 2011

We probably all know at least one person who is bummed they missed out on the initial round of invites for Music Beta by Google. Well friends, you can be the bearer of good news for those troubled souls (who haven’t moved on to other online music pursuits, of course), as we discovered through a fellow music enthusiast. Members of the cloud-based service are now the proud owners of two invites handed down from the Goog, to be passed out only through a thorough application and interview process. Ok, not really… but perhaps you do have the power to make two of your friends, or soon-to-be friends, pretty happy. That is, until they realize how long it will take them to upload that music library they’ve been curating since 8th grade.

[Thanks, Ralph]

Google’s Music Beta gives users two invites, keys to the cloud for their best mates originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 07:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGoogle Music Beta  | Email this | Comments

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Google Fiber puts boots on the ground, begins detail engineering in Kansas Cities

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

We’ve come a long way since Google first started taking about launching a fiber-based ISP — from beta tests, to hopeful communities, to Topeka fools day, to selecting not one, but two Kansas Cities. Now, it’s “boots on the ground,” time according to the Google Fiber blog: detail engineering starts now. In the coming weeks, Kansas City residents (presumably on both sides of the Kansas / Missouri border) can expect to see El Goog’s engineers measuring phone poles, gathering geographical data, and asking hard-hitting questions, like “What is your address?” All this footwork will help Google get a head start on building that sweet, ultra-high-speed gigabit network. Not the most glamorous bit of Google magic we’ve ever seen, but it’s still exciting to hear that preliminary work has begun. Of course, it would be even more exciting if this were coming where we lived.

Google Fiber puts boots on the ground, begins detail engineering in Kansas Cities originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 28 Jul 2011 02:59:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGoogle Fiber  | Email this | Comments

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Judge tells Oracle to rethink $2.6 billion claim against Google

Monday, July 25th, 2011
Oracle Vs. Google

The war between Google and Oracle is far from over, but the big G keeps racking up tiny victories in what are admittedly modest battles. Now the Redwood Shores-based company has been told to go back to the drawing board with its damages report. Originally Oracle sought $2.6 billion, but its theories were largely dismissed and Judge William Alsup suggested an alternative starting point of roughly $100 million. The company still has an opportunity to present a new report, one that will likely seek much more than the proposed $100 million, but things are looking increasingly tough for the claimant. It wasn’t all good news for Goog, though. While the judge told Oracle to narrow its focus from Android as a whole to just specific infringing features, he did agree that related advertising revenue should be included in the theoretical royalty base. He also offered harsh criticism for what he viewed as its “brazen” disregard for intellectual property rights. The trial is still scheduled for October, so we should have a better idea of how this whole thing will play out by Halloween.

Judge tells Oracle to rethink $2.6 billion claim against Google originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 25 Jul 2011 03:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Google trademarks Photovine, hints at new photo-sharing service

Saturday, June 18th, 2011

Google trademarks Photovine, hints at new photo-sharing serviceWell, it looks like Google’s got the online rumor mill churning with its latest trademark application. Back on June 7th, El Goog filed a USPTO application for the name Photovine, sending sparks flying down the, er, grapevine about a possible photo-sharing program. The application cites a service dedicated to the “transmission of visual images and data by telecommunications networks, wireless communication networks, the Internet, information services networks and data networks.” Unsurprisingly, it looks like the internet giant’s also picked up the corresponding domain name. So is Google getting ready to add photo storage to its recent suite of cloud services? Or is it looking to up its social media cred? And where does Picasa fit into all of this? One things for certain: we won’t be responsible for letting this round of speculation whither on the vine.

Google trademarks Photovine, hints at new photo-sharing service originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 19 Jun 2011 01:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Fusible  |  sourceUSPTO  | Email this | Comments

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Smug alert: Google says it has largest corporate EV charging network in the US (video)

Friday, June 10th, 2011
Things are just getting greener and greener over at Google. Yesterday, the company triumphantly declared that its Mountain View campus now boasts the largest corporate EV charging network in the US, with some 200 chargers currently in place, plus an extra 250 that are on the way. It’s all part of El Goog’s RechargeIt sustainability initiative, launched in 2007, which has also given rise to the Gfleet — a set of company-owned plug-ins made available for employees. Now that Google has purchased some extra Chevy Volts and Nissan Leafs, this Gfleet will eventually expand to include a total of 30 EVs, which explains the expansion of its ChargePoint Network. The ultimate goal is to have charging stations at five percent of Mountain View’s parking spaces, all of which will be searchable on Google Maps, and available for employees to use for free. The company hopes this initiative will encourage more people to purchase EVs, and estimates that it’ll eventually save a total of 5,400 tonnes of CO2 per year — the equivalent to removing about 2,000 cars from the road. Head past the break for a video on the program, or hit up the source link if you’d like to help Google pat itself on the back.

Continue reading Smug alert: Google says it has largest corporate EV charging network in the US (video)

Smug alert: Google says it has largest corporate EV charging network in the US (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 10 Jun 2011 07:10:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink CNET  |  sourceGoogle Green Blog  | Email this | Comments

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Paypal v. Google: a tawdry tale of trade secret misappropriation

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

Google and its poached Paypal employees got sued for trade secret misappropriation yesterday, but we didn’t know the dirty details until now. A peek at PayPal’s complaint reveals there’s a bit more to the story. Apparently, Paypal and Google were in talks last year to use PayPal for payments in the Android Market. Osama Bedier was in charge of those negotiations for PayPal in October of 2010, when the deal was supposed to close, but was allegedly interviewing for a mobile payment position at Google at the same time (holy conflict of interest, Batman!). The complaint claims that Bedier initially rebuffed El Goog’s advances, told PayPal of the job offer and professed that he would stay, but jumped ship a month later (bringing some PayPal coworkers with him) after being recruited by Stephanie Tilenius and the almighty dollar. Once it hired Osama, Google put the brakes on the PayPal deal and created Google Wallet. Then Google, Bedier, and Tilenius got slapped with a lawsuit. A brief rundown of the legal claims awaits you after the break.

Continue reading Paypal v. Google: a tawdry tale of trade secret misappropriation

Paypal v. Google: a tawdry tale of trade secret misappropriation originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 28 May 2011 10:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink TechCrunch  |  sourceComplaint [PDF]  | Email this | Comments

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Google backs Alta Wind Energy Center, boasts $400 million clean energy milestone

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Google announced today that it’s throwing $55 million dollars to the wind… energy, that is. A post to the official Google blog said the company has invested the aforementioned amount in the Alta Wind Energy Center, which is set to generate 1,550 megawatts of energy — enough to reportedly power 450,000 homes — from a batch of turbines in the Mojave Dessert. Developed by Terra-Gen Power, the operation will carry the resulting energy via transmission lines to “major population centers.” The ever-humble internet giant pointed out that this particular injection of funds marks a total investment of $400 million in the clean energy sector. In fact, El Goog signed a deal last year to power several of its data centers with wind power, and most recently announced the opening of a seawater-cooled data center in Finland.

Google backs Alta Wind Energy Center, boasts $400 million clean energy milestone originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 25 May 2011 08:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Physorg  |  sourceGoogle  | Email this | Comments

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Google VP lays down mobile stats, boasts 150 million Maps users

Monday, March 14th, 2011
Care for a cup of Google data, anyone? At SXSW, the vice president of location services, Marissa Mayer, stated some interesting facts about the state of all things mobile at the Goog. Most notably, the company provides its map service to 150 million users. Just to give you an idea of how many peeps that is — it’s about half the number of individuals in America. Crazy, we know. What’s more, Mayer claimed that Google Maps guided users 12 billion miles per year and that its latest build of the app saves people an average of two days worth of travel time each year. Another bit worth noting is how the company feels about Google Maps for iPhone. “We like being the default provider, but we’d like to get some of these updates out to a broader audience. That’s still a debate / question we’re considering.” Updates? An actual Google Maps application that works as a GPS on an iPhone? Wake us up when iOS 5 is previewed, or we can just keep dreaming.

Google VP lays down mobile stats, boasts 150 million Maps users originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 14 Mar 2011 10:05:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Google Social Search update makes your friends more relevant, difficult to ignore

Saturday, February 19th, 2011

Google’s been talking up its Social Search function for sometime, but up until now your friends’ tweets probably haven’t made it to the top of your search results — unless of course you’re besties with TMZ, and you’ve been searching the Miley Cyrus bong salvia rip again. Thankfully, it looks as if that could change with El Goog’s latest update to the socially minded search function, which now mixes updates from your contacts’ various online accounts, like Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, in with the standard search fair — pulling them up from their previous position at the bottom of your results. Google’s also included a photo and annotation to show the origins of relevant links, and given you the ability to manage how you connect your accounts — either publicly through your profile or privately through your account. The new functions started rolling out yesterday, which means you could be seeing a whole lot more from those contacts you regretted friending in the first place. Isn’t social media a wonderful / disastrous thing?

Google Social Search update makes your friends more relevant, difficult to ignore originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 19 Feb 2011 08:10:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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