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Livestream Broadcaster pre-orders available now, shipping at the end of May for $495

Friday, April 13th, 2012
Livestream Broadcaster pre-orders available now, shipping at the end of May for $495
A vivid memory of Cisco’s would-be FlipLive streaming camera is all we’ve got, but thankfully there’s existing devices out there like the Livestream Broadcaster to help fill that void. Priced at a whopping $495, Livestream’s Broadcaster allows it to be paired with an array of shooters via HDMI and used to stream live high-def vids to any Livestream-equipped device over Ethernet, WiFi, or with a 3G / 4G USB dongle. Aside from being capable of sending out 1080i waves, the Broadcaster can also push 720p and 480i resolutions (in case you don’t feel like being a bandwidth hog), while all video and audio encoding is done with H.264 and ACC, respectively. It’s also worth noting that the near 500 bucks includes a three-month sub to Livestream’s service, which usually costs an extra $45 per month. For now, this bright red streamer’s only available to Euros and Americans, with shipping set to commence by May 31st.

Gallery: Livestream Broadcaster press shots

Livestream Broadcaster pre-orders available now, shipping at the end of May for $495 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 13 Apr 2012 06:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Microsoft moves logistics center out of Germany, blames Motorola patent battle

Monday, April 2nd, 2012
Microsoft moves logistics center out of Germany, blames Motorola patent battleIt may be a mere thorn in the foot of a giant like Microsoft, but the ongoing H.264 licensing dispute with Motorola is clearly starting to sting. German news outlet CIO reports that Redmond has shifted part of its European logistics operation from Germany to the Netherlands, affecting around 50 jobs at a contractor called Arvato. Although it might seem like a minor shuffle, CIO reports that Microsoft explicitly blames Motorola’s patent litigation for the decision, saying it was otherwise happy with Arvato’s services in warehousing Windows and Xbox 360 titles. If this represents the start of a new trend, those tasty Euros being earned by Mannheim lawyers could potentially be cancelled out by losses elsewhere in the German economy.

[Ausgang photo via Shutterstock]

Microsoft moves logistics center out of Germany, blames Motorola patent battle originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 02 Apr 2012 06:47:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink FOSS Patents  |  sourceCIO (German)  | Email this | Comments

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Canon announces EOS 5D Mark III: 22.3 MP full-frame sensor, 6 fps, 102,400 max ISO, 1080/30p HD, yours for $3,500 (video)

Thursday, March 1st, 2012
Suffice it to say, March 2012 is a notable month for Canon. Not only does it mark the 25th anniversary of the first EOS SLR, but it’s also ushering in Canon’s latest addition to its full-frame DSLR lineup. That gorgeous beast your eyes are feasting upon is the company’s new EOS 5D Mark III. That’s right folks, this isn’t a replacement for the Mark II, but rather an updated variant meant to sit between the workhorse of four years and the company’s soon to arrive EOS-1D X. At a glance, the shooter is nearly indistinguishable from its older sibling, although a closer inspection reveals a new name badge, improved weather- and dust-resistance and some slight tweaks to its top-mounted info display and buttons on the back.

Don’t be fooled, however, as there are obviously major changes here worthy of the new moniker. Key specs include a larger 1,040,000-dot 3.2-inch rear LCD, Digic 5+ processor, 22.3-megapixel CMOS sensor, 61-Point High Density Reticular autofocus with 41 cross-types (all of which are borrowed from the 1D X), dual memory card slots (SD and CompactFlash) an extended ISO range of 50 to 102,400 (100 to 25,600, natively), OVF with 100 percent coverage (vs 98 previously), and a maximum 6 FPS burst speed. Naturally, the 5D Mark III is no slouch in the video department: it can capture h.264 footage at HD resolutions up to 1080 at 24/25/30p or 720 at 50/60p, with an effective ISO range of 100-128,000, and of course there’s a stereo mic input for the microphone of your choice. Better yet, not only does it allow for real-time control of your audio levels during filming, but also monitoring, being the first EOS-series DSLR to come equipped with a headphone jack (!) — something sorely missing in the world of ILC cameras. We’ve only skimmed the surface, however, so join us past the break for further details and a quick video overview.

Continue reading Canon announces EOS 5D Mark III: 22.3 MP full-frame sensor, 6 fps, 102,400 max ISO, 1080/30p HD, yours for $3,500 (video)

Canon announces EOS 5D Mark III: 22.3 MP full-frame sensor, 6 fps, 102,400 max ISO, 1080/30p HD, yours for $3,500 (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 02 Mar 2012 00:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Silverlight hits 5.0, Microsoft silent as to its future

Sunday, December 11th, 2011

Last we heard, there were whispers that Redmond’s favorite runtime / framework / Flash-killer was due for a fresh release “soon.” Confirming those rumors is version 5.0 of Microsoft’s cross-platform Silverlight, now available for download. Headlining the release is hardware decoding of H.264 streams, improved postscript printing and a better graphics stack, replete with support for things in the third dimension. Rumors that Silverlight’s own luminance is fading still go unanswered, without confirmation or denial from Microsoft — but why let uncertainty get you down? Hit the source and turn that frown upside down.

Silverlight hits 5.0, Microsoft silent as to its future originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 12 Dec 2011 00:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Plex 1.1 for iOS improves streaming over 3G, pipes video to your TV

Sunday, April 10th, 2011

If you’re not already running the Plex Media Server on one of the twenty-three beige boxes networked across your tiny domicile, you may be sorely tempted to install a copy this week, because the iOS app has just received a truly massive update. Where once the XBMC spinoff would have to transcode every video it delivered to your device across the ether, Plex claims it can now either bypass that CPU-intensive process or use an iOS-optimized technique, pumping H.264 video over the air far more efficiently. Second, it can deliver that content from iOS direct to your TV, via either a video-out cable or experimental support for AirPlay. Not bad, right? How’s universal search sound — the ability to type in a word and have the app reach out to local servers, remote servers, and online video services like YouTube and Vimeo too? Yeah, that $4.99 price tag is looking mighty affordable right about now, and there are plenty more improvements to peruse at the links below.

Plex 1.1 for iOS improves streaming over 3G, pipes video to your TV originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 10 Apr 2011 06:03:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink 9to5 Mac, MacStories  |  sourcePlex (iTunes)  | Email this | Comments

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Adobe Flash Player 10.2 for Android landing March 18

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Adobe has announced that it will release Flash Player 10.2 for Android 2.2 (Froyo) and Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) devices, as well as a beta version for Android 3.0.1 Honeycomb tablets, on March 18th. The release will provide performance improvements and take advantage of the dual-core and GPU-enabled processors in phones such as the Motorola ATRIX 4G and LG Optimus 2X. The addition of a new soft-keyboard should make it easier for developers to optimize desktop apps for use on full-touchscreen smartphones and tablets, too. Adobe worked closely with Google on the new Android 3.0.1 Honeycomb update to add support for hardware accelerated, HD, H.264 video content using the Stage Video rendering pipeline. On Honeycomb tablets, Flash Player 10.2 will also offer improved webpage scrolling, and better support for websites that implement HTML content on top of Flash Player content. Unfortunately, these features won’t be supported on Android 2.2 (Froyo) or Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) just yet, however.

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Skype updates iOS app for Verizon iPhone; video calling coming to Verizon, Android sets February 28th?

Thursday, February 10th, 2011

Two quick bits of Skype news to report. Today, the internet-based communications company has posted an update to its iOS client. The new code allows the app to function on the Verizon iPhone and adds H.264 support. The additional MP4-codec will allow users to place calls from their iOS device to a wider range of Skype-enabled devices, including TVs.

The second, less official bit of Skype news comes courtesy of blog Droid-Life. The site has acquired information that indicates video-calling capabilities will be coming to Skype mobile for Android — for Verizon Wireless devices only — on the 28th of February. Unfortunately, it does look like  those with LTE, Android handsets will be the only ones able to utilize the voice calling capabilities — it is unclear whether you will have to actually be connected to Verizon’s LTE network to initiate a video call. We should know more in the coming weeks.

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Google defends H.264 removal from Chrome, says WebM plug-ins coming to Safari and IE9

Sunday, January 16th, 2011

Google renewed a heated discussion when it said it was dropping H.264 support from Chrome’s HTML5 video tag last week, but it seems the company’s ready and willing to push its WebM alternative video format hard — not only is hardware decoder IP now available for the VP8 codec, but the project team is presently readying WebM plug-ins for Safari and Internet Explorer 9, neither of which include it themselves. As to the little matter of whether any of this is the right move for the web at large, we’ll paraphrase what Google had to say for itself: H.264 licenses cost money; Firefox and Opera don’t support H.264 either; and big companies like Google are helping the little guy by championing this open alternative. We have to say, the eternal optimist in us is cheering them on. Oh, and the linguist in us, too. Read Google’s own words at our source link, and decide for yourself.

Google defends H.264 removal from Chrome, says WebM plug-ins coming to Safari and IE9 originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 16 Jan 2011 02:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceThe Chromium Blog  | Email this | Comments

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Ambarella’s Cortex A9-based iOne is the smartphone processor of your dreams… but it’s for your camera

Thursday, December 23rd, 2010

You may not have heard of Ambarella factoring into the smartphone processor race alongside Qualcomm, TI, and Samsung, and there’s a good reason for that: they don’t do smartphone processors. Rather, these guys are in the business of making video and photographic processing chips, and their latest — the iOne — is a doozy. Starting with a dual-core Cortex-A9 at 1GHz, the iOne adds in an extra ARM11 core at 533MHz dedicated to handling camera functions and ensuring ready times of under one second. It’s capable of real-time encode and decode of H.264 1080p video content at 30fps and includes a GPU that can run OpenGL ES 2.0 for what we can only assume would be the wildest camera UI you’ve ever seen. What kind of beastly point-and-shoot is this, anyway? Well, Ambarella envisions cameras running Android before too long, and when you think about it, the hardware difference between a smartphone and a digital camera is getting smaller by the day — so it would make sense that this iOne sounds so much like something we’d like to have powering our handsets. We can dream, can’t we? Follow the break for the press release.

Continue reading Ambarella’s Cortex A9-based iOne is the smartphone processor of your dreams… but it’s for your camera

Ambarella’s Cortex A9-based iOne is the smartphone processor of your dreams… but it’s for your camera originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 23 Dec 2010 03:45:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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RIM announces BlackBerry PlayBook tablet

Monday, September 27th, 2010

Today, at the BlackBerry Developer Conference (DevCon), RIM CEO Mike Laziridis announced the BlackBerry Playbook. The PlayBook has a 7-inch hi-res widescreen display, is 9.7 mm thick, supports Flash 10.1 with hardware accelerated video, HTML 5, 1080p video, has non-proprietary HDMI and USB connections, full-HD front and rear-facing camera, support for dual-displays (with use of HDMI cable), will be able to connect with BlackBerry Enterprise Servers out of the box via Bluetooth secure pairing to BlackBerry. The device will have a 1 GHz dual-core processor (with symmetrical multiprocessing capabilities) and 1 GB RAM. The device OS, which is developed by QNX, is POSIX based and will get a native SDK which supports Adobe Air, Flash, and OpenGL 2.0.

Official Specifications

  • 7” LCD, 1024 x 600, WSVGA, capacitive touch screen with full multi-touch and gesture support
  • BlackBerry Tablet OS with support for symmetric multiprocessing
  • 1 GHz dual-core processor
  • 1 GB RAM
  • Dual HD cameras (3 MP front facing, 5 MP rear facing), supports 1080p HD video recording
  • Video playback: 1080p HD Video, H.264, MPEG, DivX, WMV
  • Audio playback: MP3, AAC, WMA
  • HDMI video output
  • Wi-Fi – 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
  • Connectors: microHDMI, microUSB, charging contacts
  • Open, flexible application platform with support for WebKit/HTML-5, Adobe Flash Player 10.1, Adobe Mobile AIR, Adobe Reader, POSIX, OpenGL, Java
  • Ultra thin and portable: 
    • Measures 5.1”x7.6”x0.4” (130mm x 193mm x 10mm)
    • Weighs less than a pound (approximately 0.9 lb or 400g)
  • Additional features and specifications of the BlackBerry PlayBook will be shared on or before the date this product is launched in retail outlets.
  • RIM intends to also offer 3G and 4G models in the future.

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Apple TV vs. the competition — how does it stack up?

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

Although it’s only just been revealed and won’t actually go on sale for four long weeks, Apple’s new hockey puck is far from the only media streamer on the market — and with Sony’s Netbox and the Boxee Box on the way, the sub-$200 set-top box market is exploding with options. So let’s line up the revised Apple TV against the (post-price cut) Roku HD-XR, Popbox, and even an LG Blu-ray player in the same price range and see what you’re actually getting — and more importantly, getting access to — on each device. Oh, and there’s some choice words from Roku after the break.

Device: AppleTV Roku XR Pop Box LG BD550
Price: $99 $99 $129 $130 – $150
Form Factor/Size: 3.9 x 0.9 x 3.9 5 x 5 x 1.75 8 x 1.4 x 6 inches 16.9 x 1.8 x 7.9
Available Content: HD TV shows from ABC & Fox (.99), HD Movie rentals ($4.99/$3.99), Netflix, iTunes, YouTube Netflix, Amazon VOD, MLB.tv, UFC, NBA GameTime, YouTube, Pandora YouTube, Revision3, Blip.tv, h.264 / XviD / MPEG-4, MKV / AVI / WMV Blu-ray discs, VUDU, Netflix, CinemaNow, YouTube, Pandora, Napster
Apps / SDK: N/A Roku Channel / SDK available Popapps Store / SDK available NetCast widgets
Connectivity: WiFi N, Ethernet WiFi N, Ethernet Ethernet, optional WiFi adapter Ethernet, Disc
Video Quality: 720p, 5.1 audio 720p (1080p upgrade coming soon), 5.1 audio 1080p, 5.1 audio 1080p, 7.1 audio, DTS-HD MA / Dolby TrueHD audio

Continue reading Apple TV vs. the competition — how does it stack up?

Apple TV vs. the competition — how does it stack up? originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Sep 2010 18:14:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Stamp $50 Android tablet prototype raises eyebrows in India and beyond (video)

Monday, August 23rd, 2010
Stamp (no relation to Terence) is an Android-powered tablet that’s making waves mostly for its price: $50. AllGo Embedded Systems has been leaking information out since April, and while there’s nothing incredible revolutionary here (Android 2.1, MPEG-4 / H.264 Video playback, USB mass storage support, WiFi connectivity, FM radio, NAND or SD-card boot), in light of the much-ballyhooed $35 tablet it’s good to see a comparatively priced platform that you won’t need to be either a student in India (or purchase a million units) to get your hands on. Of course, a lot can happen between now and… whenever the thing is released, but don’t let that get you down. It looks like the age of low-powered Android tablets is coming closer every day. And that can only be a good thing, right? Video after the break.

Continue reading Stamp $50 Android tablet prototype raises eyebrows in India and beyond (video)

Stamp $50 Android tablet prototype raises eyebrows in India and beyond (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Aug 2010 10:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Lilliputing  |  sourceAllGo Embedded Systems  | Email this | Comments

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Nikon D3100 DSLR hands-on

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

In addition to the S1100pj and S5100, we also had a chance to play with Nikon’s 14.2 megapixel D3100 earlier today. Sadly, due to the non-final firmware, we weren’t allowed to obtain live sample stills and 1080p H.264 clips from the prototype DSLR, so we can’t comment too much on the new CMOS sensor’s picture quality. Still, there were some interesting features to take home with. Most notably, the seemingly solid D3100 has an improved grip compared to its predecessor and our own D5000 — it certainly felt nice and secure in our hands despite the small (and slightly lighter) body. We also dig the new quick switch (resting by the now-larger dial) for picking various continuous shooting modes, along with the new spring-loaded live-view trigger and video recording button (both at the top-right corner of the 3-inch 460k-dot screen).

Of course, we couldn’t have gone home without having tested the video mode’s headlining continuous autofocus feature — we weren’t able to tell how much motor noise might have gone into the clips, but the bundled 18-55mm lens was able to autofocus or track subjects at reasonable speeds, provided that we weren’t zooming or moving about too rapidly. The only real bug we noticed was that sometimes the tracking may get overridden by large nearby objects with similar colors, so hopefully the final firmware will reduce this error. Another concern is with the new 1,030mAh battery — no word on how many shots or video hours it can provide, but we shall find out when this $699 DSLR comes out next month.

Nikon D3100 DSLR hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 19 Aug 2010 15:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Motorola CHARM specifications

Friday, July 9th, 2010

Motorola CHARM-2

Wednesday, T-Mobile and Motorola officially announced an Android 2.1 handset named the CHARM. While the press release was nice, it did lack a certain level of detail that we prefer. Yesterday, Moto put up the official specs page for the CHARM, so with further ado, here is the extended spec sheet:

  • WCDMA 1700/2100, GSM 850/900/1800/1900, HSDPA 3.6 Mbps (Category 5/6), EDGE Class 12, GPRS Class 12
  • Android 2.1 with Motoblur and Flash Lite browsing
  • 3 Megapixel fixed focus camera with digital zoom
  • Video playback and capture at 24 fps (supported playback codecs: AAC, H.264, MP3, MPEG-4, WMA9, ACC+ Enhanced, WMV v9, AMR NB, AAC+)
  • 1170 mAh battery (WDCMA standby 334 hours, GSM standby 267 hours)
  • Support for Exchange, Gmail, IMAP, and POP3 email
  • Bluetooth 2.0 + ERD (A2DP, AVRCP, BPP, HID, HSP, OPP, PAN)
  • Wi-Fi (b/g/n)
  • GPS
  • 2GB micro-SD card included (support for up to a 32 GB card)
  • 2.8″ TFT touchscreen display with Gorilla Glass (says it includes “pinch-to-zoom” but does not specify multitouch)
  • Accelerometer, proximity and ambient light sensors
  • Size: 67.2 x 98.4 x 11.4 mm
  • Weight: 110 grams

There you have it. Is the CHARM, uh, charming anyone?

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Adobe Flash Player 10.1 up for grabs

Thursday, June 10th, 2010

flash-101-download

It’s been a long time coming, but Flash Player 10.1 has finally been released. For Windows users with relatively new rigs this means that you’ll be able to put less of a strain on your system when watching streaming videos thanks to hardware acceleration for H.264 video. Sadly the Mac-specific version released today still lacks this feature, but it will be made available just as soon as Adobe is finished polishing up the “Gala” edition of Flash Player 10.1.

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Sanyo Xacti DMX-CA100 joins the ‘waterproof pocket HD camcorder’ crew

Sunday, May 30th, 2010

Sure, Sanyo’s PR claims this camera is the “world’s first waterproof full HD camera,” but unfortunately for them Kodak beat them to the punch. A caveat at the bottom of the PR clarifies that this claim was merely meant for “Full HD video cameras for consumer use with optical zoom lenses,” which naturally makes everything better. Plus there’s no point in getting down on Sanyo, since it’s essentially delivered its classic Xacti form factor and middle-of-the-road image quality in a waterproof (up to 10 feet) chassis. The DMX-CA100 will be launched at the end of June for some unnamed price, and shoots 1080p video to H.264, 14 megapixel stills, and offers a 6x optical zoom augmented by a 6x “Advanced Zoom” that crops the image sensor instead of just blowing up the pixels like a regular digital zoom.

Sanyo Xacti DMX-CA100 joins the ‘waterproof pocket HD camcorder’ crew originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 31 May 2010 01:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung’s EX1 / TL500 flagship compact articulates ‘release’ in Korean

Monday, May 17th, 2010

It’s out, Samsung’s 10 megapixel EX1 (aka, TL500) with 3-inch articulating AMOLED display was just pushed out for retail in its Korean homeland. For 599,000KRW or about $400, you get a F1.8 24mm ultra-wide lens, 1/1.7-inch CCD, refined DRIMeIII imaging processor, dual image stabilization, and ISO 3200 max sensitivity (at full resolution) that should combine to deliver decent shots (for a compact) in low-light conditions without using a flash. As Samsung’s flagship compact it also supports RAW with shutter‑priority, aperture‑priority and full-manual shooting modes. Unfortunately, H.264 video is limited to 640×480 pixels at 30fps. Fortunately, an optional optical viewfinder can be fitted to the hot shoe in case the AMOLED display fails to hold up under direct sunlight — a very real possibility since there’s no mention of Samsung’s “Super AMOLED” anywhere in the press release. Can’t wait to see the reviews on this pup.

Samsung’s EX1 / TL500 flagship compact articulates ‘release’ in Korean originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 17 May 2010 05:40:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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