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Posts Tagged ‘Monopoly’

Windows Phone OS mod speeds up app load times, knows you’ll play Monopoly on your break (video)

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Experimental Windows Phone mod Falcon speeds up app load times, knows you were going to do that

Microsoft Research has revealed some of its latest work into mobile app optimization — and it’s called the contextual solution, Falcon. Fast App Launching with Context aims to improve “key OS services” including memory management, scheduling and security. It does this by using location and sci-fi-sounding “temporal access patterns” — when you use the app — to pre-load programs before you’ve even decided to use them, which dramatically reduces perceived loading delay. A learning algorithm baked into the Windows Phone OS mod also improves its behavior and predictive powers as you use it. In the project’s own tests, users were apparently saving up to 35 seconds on a single app launch. There’s no news on whether the developmental mod will find its way into future Windows Phone iterations, but if our phone just knew to pre-load Kinectimals each morning — the only thing that gets us through those 7am commutes– we’d be more than willing to give it a go.

Continue reading Windows Phone OS mod speeds up app load times, knows you’ll play Monopoly on your break (video)

Windows Phone OS mod speeds up app load times, knows you’ll play Monopoly on your break (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 17 Apr 2012 14:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Amazon Appstore for Android celebrates a year of life, deals for a week

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

Whatever Google can do, Amazon can do… too? Sure seems it, as the latter is celebrating a rather momentous occasion by giving back to the people that have brought it this far: you (and you, and you!). The Amazon Appstore for Android has officially been alive and kicking for 12 months, and Bezos and co. are slashing prices for a week instead of tossing one forgettable party. We’re told to expect rock-bottom rates on iconic titles such as Fruit Ninja, Wolfram Alpha, Splashtop Remote Desktop, Dr. Seuss’s The Shape of Me and Other Stuff, TuneIn Radio Pro, TETRIS, PAC-MAN, The Lost City, MONOPOLY, AccuWeather Platinum and more. Birthday deals start today with one of the top paid apps, Plants vs. Zombies, at 67 percent off, and you can expect to see more in the coming days. Crack open that dusty wallet and hit the source link, vaquero.

Continue reading Amazon Appstore for Android celebrates a year of life, deals for a week

Amazon Appstore for Android celebrates a year of life, deals for a week originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 15 Mar 2012 10:53:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceAmazon  | Email this | Comments

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This Is The Game That The RIAA And The MPAA Want to Play With You [Sopa]

Saturday, January 21st, 2012

Class action monopoly lawsuit against Apple and AT&T gets okay from federal judge

Monday, July 12th, 2010

Apple Logo-Black + White

The AP reports that a California federal judge has given the go-ahead to a monopoly class action lawsuit, against both Apple and AT&T, over several aspects of the iPhone. The suit claims that Apple, in making AT&T its exclusive partner, drove up prices and stifled competition in the smartphone market. The suit seeks to, “keep Apple from selling locked iPhones in the U.S. and from determining what iPhone programs people can install.” Naturally, the suit also seeks “damages to cover legal fees and other costs.” Apple has yet to release in an official statement in regards to the suit, but did say that it had not hurt competition. Unlocked iPhones and the ability to install applications from third party sources (Cydia!) sound pretty good to us.

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Australia to pay Telstra A$11 billion for entire copper network

Sunday, June 20th, 2010

The Australian government just found the infrastructure for its A$43 billion national broadband project and eliminated its largest competitor in one fell swoop — pending shareholder and regulator approval, Telstra will receive A$11 billion of that money in exchange for its entire landline network. Telstra will decommission its monopoly of copper cables to make room for the government’s fiber and migrate its customers to the resulting 100Mbps National Broadband Network (NBN) as those light-bearing threads roll out. While Telstra might become a smaller player in the internet and cable business without a land network of its own, it may get even larger in the wireless space — the company says it’s received “written confirmation from the Prime Minister” that it can bid on a chunk of precious LTE spectrum should the deal go through. Press release after the break.

Continue reading Australia to pay Telstra A$11 billion for entire copper network

Australia to pay Telstra A$11 billion for entire copper network originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 20 Jun 2010 15:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Apple confirms it signed a 5-year iPhone exclusivity deal with AT&T

Monday, May 10th, 2010

iPhone_3GS

Three years. That’s how long it took for the world to get confirmation that the iPhone exclusivity deal Apple signed with AT&T back in 2007 was good for 5-years. Here’s how the info came about. Back in 2008, Apple’s legal team was in a courtroom in San Jose fending off a lawsuit which alleged that it was benefiting from an illegal monopoly over the iPhone, saying that AT&T’s 5-year exclusivity would really require iPhone owners to re-sign with AT&T for an additional 3-years after their initial 2-year contract had expired. This, in part, was Apple’s response:

[...] there was widespread disclosure of [AT&T's] five-year exclusivity and no suggestion by Apple or anyone else that iPhones would become unlocked after two years. In fact, the iPhone box itself disclosed to the prospective purchaser that a “[s]ervice plan with AT&T [would be] required for cellular network capabilities on expiration of initial new two-year agreement.” This at-purchase information was more than enough disclosure to put consumers on notice that they might never have a choice of cellular service for their iPhone, and to thus preclude a Kodak-type aftermarket.

Moreover, it is sheer speculation –- and illogical -– that failing to disclose the five-year exclusivity term would produce monopoly power, i.e., would allow Apple, a brand new entrant in cell phones, to “exert raw power in the aftermarket without regard for commercial consequences in the foremarket.”

The only question now is whether or not the contract is still valid. As Engadget’s Nilay Patel points out, “Contracts can be canceled, amended, and breached in many ways, and AT&T’s spotty recent service history plus the explosion of the iPhone and the mobile market in general have given Apple any number of reasons to revisit the deal. In addition, the two companies obviously hit the negotiating table again to hammer out the iPad’s pricing plans, and there’s no way of knowing whether that deal involves the iPhone as well. But it’s nice to finally know for certain that AT&T’s initial iPhone exclusivity period was booked until 2012 — now we just have to see if all this recent chatter means something’s changed.”

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Apple to announce iAd / AdKit mobile ad platform on Thursday?

Tuesday, April 6th, 2010

Here’s an interesting little rumor that seems all too plausible: Peter Kafka at All Things Digital says sources are telling him Apple will announce a new mobile ad network based on its Quattro Wireless acquisition on Thursday at its iPhone OS 4 event, a report that jibes completely with what we learned about the iAd / AdKit framework present in the iPhone OS just last week. Kafka also says that Google will undoubtedly cheer the move on, since it’s trying to convince the FTC to approve its $750m AdMob acquisition — the presence of a formidable competitor like Apple in the mobile ad space makes the buyout seem more like healthy business and less like “evil monopoly that owns every ad on the internet and is stalking innocents for their flesh with Google Buzz.” Our guess is that Apple will give developers a standard way to place ads in their apps using a new OS service and split the revenue 70/30, just like paid apps in the App Store, but that’s just a shot in the dark — we’ll see what happens on Thursday.

Apple to announce iAd / AdKit mobile ad platform on Thursday? originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 06 Apr 2010 19:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceAll Things Digital  | Email this | Comments

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WSJ: Verizon definitely getting the iPhone

Monday, March 29th, 2010

iPhone_3GS

If the Wall Street Journal is correct, AT&T’s iPhone monopoly is guaranteed to fizzle out at the end of this summer. According to people “briefed on the matter” a special CDMA version of the iPhone will be made starting this September by Pegatron Technology Corp., a subsidiary of ASUSTeK Computer Inc. To which company will this CDMA device be headed? None other than Verizon Wireless. Yeah. Holy crap. Definitely a blow to AT&T, but on the bright side, it too will be getting a new model, built once again by Hon Hai Precision Industry Co and most likely in June.

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iriver Story e-reader hands-on

Friday, January 8th, 2010

At one point in time it seemed like iriver had a monopoly on insane, imaginative designs. Sure, it was mostly centered around PMPs, but iriver’s stuff in its heyday was fun enough to make even a screenless MP3 player seem interesting. Lately, however, things seem a little more conservative. Take this iriver Story, for instance: it’s a sexy device that seems very on par with other e-readers on the market… and that’s about it. We played around with it a bit on the show floor, and found the keyboard to be pretty great, the design solid and slim, and the software pretty slow. With all the extra function-specific buttons on the keyboard, there’s less of the arbitrary UI navigation limitations posed by some of the more simplistic e-book readers, but there’s nothing so amazing or useful on the device that it would tempt the Kindle faithful. We’re particularly worried about book load times, but it’ll take some more time with the unit to really see how it stacks up across the board. For now you can check out a video walkthrough of the device after the break.

Continue reading iriver Story e-reader hands-on

iriver Story e-reader hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 08 Jan 2010 22:02:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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FTC sues Intel for alleged monopoly abuse

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

Here we go, folks. FTC is suing Intel for what it sees to be “anticompetitive tactics.” The FTC has been circling this debate since last year, but now it has followed in the steps of the EU, and the New York attorney general (but no longer a cash-flush AMD) in prosecuting the chip giant. The FTC claims, among other things, that Intel has abused its monopoly position to “[wage] a systematic campaign to shut out rivals’ competing microchips by cutting off their access to the marketplace.” Tough words. The FTC says that Intel messed with a compiler to cheat competitors out of performance gains, has “stifled innovation” and “harmed consumers.” The damages the FTC is after are a bit less clear: mainly it wants to stop Intel from keeping out competition or building or modifying its own products to impair the performance of other products. We’ll be diving into the implications of this as we find out more, but it looks like Christmas came early for NVIDIA.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in]

FTC sues Intel for alleged monopoly abuse originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 16 Dec 2009 10:41:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceMarketWatch  | Email this | Comments

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Apple wins copyright infringement case against Psystar in California

Saturday, November 14th, 2009

Well, well. Apple’s won its copyright infringement claim against would-be Mac cloner Psystar in California. Anyone surprised? As we’ve been saying all along, the key argument wasn’t the OS X EULA or Psystar’s failed monopoly claims, but pure, simple copyright infringement, since Psystar was illegally copying, modifying, and distributing Apple’s code. Psystar was also dinged for circumventing Apple’s kernel encryption in violation of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act, but that’s just another nail in the coffin, really. There’s still some legal fireworks to come, as Apple’s various other claims like breach of contract, trademark infringement, and unfair competition weren’t addressed in this ruling, but those are all secondary issues now — and we’d expect this decision to have quite an impact on the other case currently ongoing in Florida. We’ve broken down the highlights after the break, hit up the read link for the PDF and follow along.

[Via Groklaw]

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Apple wins copyright infringement case against Psystar in California originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 14 Nov 2009 17:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Rogers’ HSPA monopoly comes tumbling down as Bell’s HSPA network goes live

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

bell-hspa-party

We don’t think we need to go over what an insanely huge day today is for Canada, but in case anyone is feeling particularly thick, we’re going to spell it out plan and simple — Rogers is no longer the only HSPA game in Canada. Bell’s 21Mbps HSPA network has at long last gone live. As with any network launch, a few awesome handsets, data cards and a few Canadian-style rip-off plans have come along for the ride. So hit the jump and check out what’s new.

Smartphones

  • Apple iPhone 3G – $99.95 / 599.95 (3-year contract / no strings attached)
  • Apple iPhone 3GS (16GB) – $199.95 / $699.95
  • Apple iPhone 3GS (32GB) – $299.95 / $799.95
  • BlackBerry Bold 9700 – $229.95 / $599.95
  • BlackBerry Bold 9000 – $249.95 / $599.95
  • Samsung Omnia II – $199.95 / $549.95

Non-Smartphones

  • LG Xenon – $89.95 / $289.95
  • Nokia 2730 – $27.95 / $119.95
  • Nokia 6350 – $49.95 / $249.95
  • Samsung Impact – $79.95 / $279.95

Data Sticks

  • Novatel Wireless U950 – $24.95 / $174.95
  • Novatel Wireless U998 – $74.95 / $174.95
  • Novatel Wireless X950 – $24.95 / $174.95

SIM Cards

  • $0 / $5

As for price plans, not all that much has changed (the $6.95 SAF is staying for now), but Bell did introduce some iPhone specific plans which are as follows:

Combo 45 for iPhone

  • 100 anytime local minutes plus 50 bonus local minutes
  • Local Fab Five: Unlimited calling & text to and from five local numbers of your choice
  • 500 MB of data for personal email, Internet browsing
  • Unlimited local nights & weekends (9 p.m. – 7 a.m.)

Combo 55 for iPhone

  • 300 anytime local minutes
  • Local Fab Five
  • 1 GB of data for personal email, Internet browsing
  • Unlimited local nights & weekends (9 p.m. – 7 a.m.)

Combo 75 for iPhone

  • 400 anytime local minutes
  • Nationwide Fab Five: Unlimited calling & text to and from five local numbers of your choice nationwide
  • 2 GB of data for personal email, Internet browsing
  • Unlimited local nights & weekends (9 p.m. – 7 a.m.)

Combo 95 for iPhone

  • 500 anytime local minutes
  • Nationwide Fab Five
  • 2 GB of data for personal email, Internet browsing
  • Unlimited local nights & weekends (9 p.m. – 7 a.m.)

Now to sit and wait for TELUS’ day in the sun to see what, if any, surprises it has in store beyond what we already know.

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