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Posts Tagged ‘Rfid’

Does the World Really Need a Smartphone-Controlled Rice Cooker? [Appliances]

Saturday, March 17th, 2012

The world may not, but according to Panasonic, Japan certainly does. The company’s new SR-SX2 is about as fancy as rice cookers get, since it includes wireless RFID hardware letting it be programmed and configured using an Android smartphone. More »


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Ortho-Tag Uses RFID To Identify Your Implants [Science]

Monday, June 13th, 2011

When you have a prosthetic device implanted in your body, how do you retrieve information about it? You can’t look at the bottom for a model number and you don’t want to go under the knife to find the manufacturer. More »


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DC Fast Charger joins the ECOtality EV charging station fleet, looks like a fuel pump

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

You can’t help but smile, can you? ECOtality‘s latest entrant into the rapidly expanding Blink line of EV chargers looks awfully familiar to avid motorists, and for good reason. Designed to mimic a conventional petrol pump, the DC Fast Charger should blend right in when installed in Best Buy parking lots, gas stations and beyond, with the company aiming to get these positioned in a wide variety of locations in order to ease “range anxiety.” We’re also told that motorists will eventually be able to utilize the Blink Network Smartphone Application in order to locate the nearest charging station and receive GPS directions, and an RFID-enabled payment system makes it easy to drain your wallet, rejuvenate your vehicle and get you back on the open road. There’s even a 42-inch LCD on the top, and while it’s primarily engineered for ads and information, we’re sure a few wire swaps would have your Xbox 360 displayed in no time flat. The DC Fast Charger should be hitting 16 major American cities in the near future, and there’s a video after the break to tide you over.

Continue reading DC Fast Charger joins the ECOtality EV charging station fleet, looks like a fuel pump

DC Fast Charger joins the ECOtality EV charging station fleet, looks like a fuel pump originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 14 Oct 2010 09:49:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceFrog Design  | Email this | Comments

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Cleveland approves $2.5 million for RFID recycling bins, a hopefully rare fine

Sunday, August 22nd, 2010



When it comes to trash can technology, there’s little doubt the United Kingdom is on top, what with the bomb-proof and RFID-laden bins denizens have been subjected to for years. Still, the US has trialed traceable cans for some time now, and the city of Cleveland, Ohio’s just decided to make them stick, shelling out $2.5 million last week for 150,000 households worth of electronically-accountable recycling. Unlike prior garbage tracing schemes, however, citizens won’t be charged according to the raw weight of undesirables in their can, but rather tested to make sure at least 10 percent of the recycling bin’s contents are actually recyclable — else face a $100 fine. That may sound a little pricey, but let’s face facts: if 91 percent of what you toss in your recycling bin is garbage, you’re not exactly helping the planet.

Cleveland approves $2.5 million for RFID recycling bins, a hopefully rare fine originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 22 Aug 2010 04:03:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink CNET  |  sourceCleveland.com  | Email this | Comments

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Hacker intercepts phone calls with homebuilt $1,500 IMSI catcher, claims GSM is beyond repair

Saturday, July 31st, 2010

In 2009, Chris Paget showed the world the vulnerabilities of RFID by downloading the contents of US passports from the safety of his automobile. This year, he’s doing the same for mobile phones. Demonstrating at DefCon 2010, the white hat hacker fooled 17 nearby GSM phones into believing his $1,500 kit (including a laptop and two RF antennas) was a legitimate cell phone base station, and proceeded to intercept and record audience calls. “As far as your cell phones are concerned, I’m now indistinguishable from AT&T,” he told the crowd. The purpose of the demonstration was highlight a major flaw in the 2G GSM system, which directs phones to connect to the tower with the strongest signal regardless of origin — in this case, Paget’s phony tower.

The hacker did caveat that his system could only intercept outbound calls, and that caller ID could tip off the owner of a handset to what’s what, but he says professional IMSI catchers used by law enforcement don’t suffer from such flaws and amateur parity would only be a matter of time. “GSM is broken,” Paget said, “The primary solution is to turn it off altogether.” That’s a tall order for a world still very dependent on the technology for mobile connectivity, but we suppose AT&T and T-Mobile could show the way. Then again, we imagine much of that same world is still using WEP and WPA1 to “secure” their WiFi.

Hacker intercepts phone calls with homebuilt $1,500 IMSI catcher, claims GSM is beyond repair originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 31 Jul 2010 22:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceWired, AP, MobileBeat, Forbes, IDG  | Email this | Comments

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An RFID Globe That Controls a Google Earth Tablet [Globes]

Saturday, July 31st, 2010

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