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Posts Tagged ‘S Market’

Please Let This Bluetooth Gamepad for Smartphones Be Real [Gaming]

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

The iPhone might be nibbling away at Nintendo’s market share, but there are still plenty of games that are damn near unplayable with a touchscreen. Physical buttons are the way to go, and if Levelup’s Bluetooth ROAM controller is legit, they won’t be able to take our money fast enough. More »


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Please Let This Bluetooth Gamepad for Smartphones Be Real [Gaming]

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

The iPhone might be nibbling away at Nintendo’s market share, but there are still plenty of games that are damn near unplayable with a touchscreen. Physical buttons are the way to go, and if Levelup’s Bluetooth ROAM controller is legit, they won’t be able to take our money fast enough. More »


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HTC may develop its own processors for low-end smartphones

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

HTC may be looking to follow in Samsung and Apple’s footsteps in developing its own processors, according to a rumor from China Times. The Taiwanese vendor has reportedly signed a “memorandum of cooperation” with ST-Ericsson to co-develop a new dedicated chip for low-end smartphones that will come out in 2013. The joint venture will help HTC reduce its reliance on Qualcomm and NVIDIA processors, which are predominantly featured in the company’s current smartphone offerings. HTC, which has seen slumping sales, focused previously on the high-end market. The company’s market share has declined by more than 60% in the past five months, however, forcing the manufacturer to rethink its mobile strategy.

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iPhone 4S remains best-selling U.S. smartphone in March, Samsung gains share

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Apple’s wildly popular iPhone 4S retained its position atop the smartphone ranks in the United States last month according to new data analyst data. Checks performed by Canaccord Genuity analyst Mike Walkley and his team found that Apple’s latest iPhone was the best-selling smartphone at Verizon Wireless, AT&T and Sprint in March, continuing a trend that began when the device first launched last October. “Our March channel checks indicated stronger sell-through trends versus February levels with sales rebounding after a slow start to 2012,” Walkley wrote in his report. “During March, our checks indicated the iPhone 4S remained the top smartphone in the U.S. market and Samsung gained share as smartphone penetration grows in U.S. prepaid channels.” Samsung’s Galaxy S II smartphone was ranked No.2 at AT&T and Sprint once again, and the device was the best-selling smartphone at T-Mobile, which still doesn’t offer Apple’s popular phone. Motorola’s DROID RAZR and DROID RAZR MAXX took the No.2 spot at Verizon, and the HTC Amaze was No.2 at T-Mobile. A table outlining Canaccord’s numbers follows below.


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Intel’s market share surges to 10-year high

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Intel in 2011 achieved its highest annual market share in more than 10 years, according to market research firm IHS iSuppli. The chipmaker’s market share increased 2.5 points to 15.6% from 13.1% in 2010. In the same year, the company’s revenue jumped 20.6%, outpacing nearly every other semiconductor supplier in the top-20 with the exception of Qualcomm. The jump represents the highest share Intel has attained since 2001, when the company reached a 14.9% market share. “Intel in 2011 captured the headlines with its major surge in growth,” said Dale Ford, head of electronics and semiconductor research for IHS. “The company’s rise was spurred by soaring demand for its PC-oriented microprocessors, and for its NAND flash memory used in consumer and wireless products. Intel’s revenue also was boosted by its acquisition of Infineon’s wireless business unit. The company’s strong rise helped it to stave off the rising challenge mounted by No. 2 semiconductor supplier Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., which had been whittling away at Intel’s lead in recent years.”

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Apple’s only $14 billion away from being larger than the entire U.S. retail sector

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Apple market capitalization, as it sits, is just over $514 billion — an astonishing number we’re all still getting used to. Even more amazing, however, is that Apple’s market cap is about to be larger than the entire United States retail sector. With Friday’s iPad launch, we’re guessing that $14 billion in market value won’t be an issue…

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Dear Microsoft: You’re doing it right

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Late last summer, I wrote an article titled Dear tablet makers: You’re doing it wrong in which I shared my view on what I believe to be one of the biggest problems currently facing tablet vendors. In this article, I postulated that most Android tablets failed to make a splash because, in a nutshell, they bring nothing new to the table. Of course Android offers a vastly different user interface and user experience as compared to Apple’s market-leading iPad, but in terms of true differentiation — unique and desirable features offered to tablet buyers that cannot be found on the iPad — Android tablets have historically been lacking.

This problem, I believe, stems from the early days of Android tablets. Everything has been rushed. The first round of Android tablets ran Gingerbread and, as far as user experience is concerned, it was a disaster. Hindsight is 20/20 and I have spoken off the record with executives at several consumer electronics companies who expressed remorse after having rushed these slates out the door. What’s done is done, however.

Unfortunately, the trend continued with early Honeycomb tablets. Android 3.0 offered the first Android experience that was created specifically for tablets. The UI was designed for larger displays and it was vastly improved compared to Gingerbread. But it still felt rushed.

BGR stated as much on a number of occasions, such as in our review of LG’s T-Mobile G-Slate. “Android 3.0, or ‘Honeycomb’ as Google affectionately calls it, is a stopgap build of the Android operating system,” I wrote at the time. “I am not implying that this version of the Android OS is a poor effort on Google’s part, I’m simply stating that it seems like a rushed effort intended to tide us over while Google prepares to put its best foot forward.”

Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich is still not the answer. While the UI has been further refined and new features have been added, ICS still fails to offer a truly differentiated experience. Of course Android affords a number of features iOS does not, and of course it provides flexibility that Apple’s closed platform never will, but true differentiation that appeals to the mass market is still not a part of the picture.

As it turns out, the few Android tablets that do offer some differentiation, such as Asus’s Transformer, have been well received. Unlike many of its rivals, Asus took it upon itself to create unique features where there were none. Rather than simply build a shell for Google’s tablet OS, Asus built a convertible slate that docks with a keyboard to create a netbook of sorts. Asus may have jumped the shark with its new Padfone tablet/smartphone hybrid, but the company clearly recognizes that acting as nothing but a vessel for Google’s platform and slapping on a thin UI layer is, for the most part, and exercise in futility.

At its core however, the user experience afforded by Android tablets — the look, the features, the apps, the hardware — does not deviate enough in the eyes of the general consumer. And with a few exceptions, namely Amazon’s Kindle Fire and Barnes & Noble’s Nook Tablet, Android tablets can’t beat the iPad in terms of pricing, either. Imagine the IWC Big Pilot and the Archimede Pilot XL were available at the same price. Which would you buy?

And so Microsoft is doing what Google and its Android partners have not: Microsoft is building a unique experience.

I spent about a week with Windows 8 on a reference tablet before Microsoft unveiled the Consumer Preview edition of its upcoming operating system at Mobile World Congress, and I was impressed. The Redmond-based software giant has plenty of work left to do, and I expect Windows 8 to still be a work in progress when it launches to the public later this year. Microsoft is doing a lot of things right with its next-generation OS though, and the unique Metro user interface is just one way Microsoft will distinguish its tablet experience from Apple’s.

In my earlier piece, Dear tablet makers: You’re doing it wrong, I noted that there are many ways tablet vendors might separate their slates from the iPad. I gave just one brief example, but it is one I feel could have a big impact on sales if positioned properly and marketed well: sharing.

Tablets are expensive, especially when one considers the fact that in most cases, they are a third wheel for the consumer. Today’s media tablets can’t replace a PC for many users, and they certainly can’t replace a smartphone or feature phone. For those without expendable income — most people fall into this category — a $400, $500 or $600+ tablet that can be shared between every member of a family might be far more appealing than a tablet that that can only be used by one person if privacy is at all a concern.

Personal computers support multiple user accounts. This is not a new concept. Each user can log in to a PC with a unique user name and password in order to be greeted by his or her own desktop configuration and programs. And unless there are some hackers in a household, personal files belonging to one user are not accessible to others.

This concept should have been carried over to tablets from the beginning, but Microsoft’s Windows 8 will be the first mass-market example of multi-user support. In fact, as Microsoft revealed on Monday, the company plans to take things a step further — apps purchased from Microsoft’s app store by one user on a Windows 8 machine can then be downloaded for free by other users.

Windows 8 is not a media tablet killer and it most certainly is not an iPad killer. It’s not supposed to be. Microsoft’s next-generation OS may be the first platform to approach the tablet market the right way, however. Start with a solid foundation, focus on the user experience and a wide range of capabilities, and differentiate. This is how a new platform might find success in the tablet market moving forward, and it is the road Microsoft appears to be taking.

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Switched On: The iPad’s landscape orientation

Sunday, March 11th, 2012

Each week Ross Rubin contributes Switched On, a column about consumer technology.

The two major classes of tablets seeking to grab a share of the iPad’s market have in many ways been driven by operating system advances. Windows 8 will bring the new Metro user interface and ARM support to allow what has historically been the more powerful PC class to scale down. Android 4.0 unifies the platform’s tablet and smartphone operating systems, encouraging it to take better advantage of the larger screen capabilities and scale up.

Indeed, the full potential of the new iPad won’t be known until the release of iOS 6 to fuel Apple’s historically tight pairing of hardware and software; that other shoe will likely drop at its developer conference in June. Despite the lack of a new operating system or form factor, the third-generation iPad and its now price-reduced predecessor have set the stage for how Apple plans to defending against Android and Windows tablets.

Continue reading Switched On: The iPad’s landscape orientation

Switched On: The iPad’s landscape orientation originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 11 Mar 2012 22:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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ComScore: More than 100 million smartphone users now in U.S.

Friday, March 9th, 2012

Market research firm comScore on Tuesday released the results of a three-month study on the U.S. mobile phone industry. Android and iOS continued to grow between November and January, gaining 2.3% and 1.4% respectively. Google’s mobile platform topped the charts with a total market share of 48.6%, while Apple managed to capture a 29.5% share. Research in Motion and Microsoft, however, continued to tumble, falling 2% and 1% in the same period. After surveying more than 30,000 U.S. mobile subscribers, comScore found Samsung to be the top handset manufacturer with a 25.4% market share. The company was followed by LG with a 19.7% share, Motorola with 13.2%, Apple with 12.8% and RIM with a 6.6% share. The research firm also found that the number of U.S. smartphone subscribers increased 13% since October and surpassed 100 million users for a total of 101.3 million. ComScore’s press release follows below.

comScore Reports January 2012 U.S. Mobile Subscriber Market Share

More Than 100 Million U.S. Mobile Subscribers Now Use Smartphones

RESTON, VA, March 6, 2012 – comScore, Inc. (NASDAQ: SCOR), a leader in measuring the digital world, today released data from the comScore MobiLens service, reporting key trends in the U.S. mobile phone industry during the three month average period ending January 2012. The study surveyed more than 30,000 U.S. mobile subscribers and found Samsung to be the top handset manufacturer overall with 25.4 percent market share. Google Android continued to grow its share in the smartphone market, accounting for 48.6 percent of smartphone subscribers.

OEM Market Share

For the three-month average period ending in January, 234 million Americans age 13 and older used mobile devices. Device manufacturer Samsung ranked as the top OEM with 25.4 percent of U.S. mobile subscribers, followed by LG with 19.7 percent share and Motorola with 13.2 percent share. Apple continued to capture share in the OEM market with 12.8 percent of total mobile subscribers (up 2.0 percentage points), while RIM rounded out the top five with 6.6 percent.

Smartphone Platform Market Share

The number of U.S. smartphone subscribers surpassed the 100-million mark in January, up 13 percent since October to 101.3 million subscribers. Google Android ranked as the top smartphone platform with 48.6 percent market share (up 2.3 percentage points) followed by Apple with 29.5 percent market share (up 1.4 percentage points). RIM ranked third with 15.2 percent share, followed by Microsoft (4.4 percent) and Symbian (1.5 percent).

Mobile Content Usage

In January, 74.6 percent of U.S. mobile subscribers used text messaging on their mobile device, up 2.8 percentage points. Downloaded applications were used by 48.6 percent of subscribers (up 4.8 percentage points), while browsers were used by 48.5 percent (up 4.5 percentage points). Accessing of social networking sites or blogs increased 3.4 percentage points to 35.7 percent of mobile subscribers. Game-playing was done by 31.8 percent of the mobile audience (up 2.6 percentage points), while 24.5 percent listened to music on their phones (up 3.3 percentage points).

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Toshiba Excite 10 LE to launch March 6th, a day before iPad 3 event

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Toshiba on Wednesday confirmed that its ultra-slim and light Android tablet, the Excite 10 LE, will be available on March 6th for $529, a day before Apple’s iPad 3 unveiling. The slate, originally called the Excite X10, was announced at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show and is equipped with a Gorilla Glass-covered 10.1-inch HD display with a dual-core TI OMAP 4430 processor clocked at 1.2GHz. The device also features 16GB of internal storage, a microSD slot, a 2-megapixel front-facing camera, a 5-megapixel rear camera and Android 3.2 Honeycomb, with an upgrade to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich promised to be coming in the spring. The Excite 10 LE is also “the world’s thinnest and lightest 10-inch tablet measuring just 0.3 inches (7.7mm) thin and weighing just 1.18 pounds (535g).” Toshiba’s press release follows below.

Toshiba Brings World’s Thinnest 10-Inch Tablet to U.S. Market

World’s Thinnest and Lightest 10-inch Tablet, Excite 10 LE, Available for Purchase on March 6, Starting at $529.99

IRVINE, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Toshiba’s Digital Products Division (DPD), a division of Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc., today announced that the Excite™ 10 LE tablet will be available for purchase from select U.S. retailers on March 6. Previously introduced as the Excite X10, the Excite 10 LE is the world’s thinnest and lightest 10-inch tablet measuring just 0.3 inches (7.7mm) thin and weighing just 1.18 pounds (535g).

“We have engineered this tablet with premium materials and components, given it elegant yet durable styling and more connectivity options than any other tablet in its class, while fitting everything into an astonishingly thin and light design.”

The Excite 10 LE tablet, powered by Android™, carries a starting price of $529.99 MSRP2 for the 16GB model and $599.99 MSRP for the 32GB model.
“Excite 10 LE embodies what a luxury tablet should be,” said Carl Pinto, vice president of product development, Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc., Digital Products Division. “We have engineered this tablet with premium materials and components, given it elegant yet durable styling and more connectivity options than any other tablet in its class, while fitting everything into an astonishingly thin and light design.”

A More Premium Design with All the Essentials

The thin and light Excite 10 LE features a vivid high-resolution 10.1-inch diagonal AutoBrite™ display3, delivering optimum browsing, reading and entertainment. Designed for durability and style, the device also features a high-quality magnesium alloy surface and scratch-resistant Corning® Gorilla® Glass display with an anti-smudge coating for greater resiliency.
The tablet also comes with an array of connectivity interfaces and ports on board, including micro-USB and HDMI® ports, a micro-SD slot to share content and files with other devices, plus Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth® connectivity. Stereo speakers with exclusive sound enhancements by Toshiba and SRS® Labs deliver superior audio capabilities. Front and back HD cameras provide convenient photo capture, plus 1080p video recording and video chatting.

Smart Multicore Performance with Long Battery Life
Powered by the 1.2GHz Texas Instruments OMAP™ 4430 multicore mobile processor4 and dual-channel memory, the Excite 10 LE offers smooth web browsing and multitasking plus the performance for high definition video and entertainment. Extremely power efficient, the Excite 10 LE delivers up to 8 hours of battery life.

Powered by Android

The Excite 10 LE tablet features Android 3.2, Honeycomb, and will be upgraded to Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich later this Spring. Also included is a full suite of familiar Google™ Mobile Service applications, including the Android Market™, YouTube™, Gmail™, Google Maps™, Music, Videos. Additionally, the tablet comes pre-loaded with a mix of Toshiba software and third-party applications including TOSHIBA App Place, TOSHIBA Book Place, TOSHIBA Media Player, TOSHIBA File Manager as well Netflix™ and Zinio™.

Docking and Accessories

Toshiba will also offer a suite of tablet accessories for the Excite 10 LE, including a docking station, multiple cases and more.

Specifications

• Android 3.2, Honeycomb (upgradeable to Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich)
• 10.1-inch diagonal LED Backlit widescreen Corning Gorilla Glass display with IPS technology and 10-finger multi-touch support
• 1280 x 800 resolution, 16:10 aspect ratio
• Texas Instruments OMAP 4430 multicore processor; 1.2GHz with 1GB LPDDR2 RAM
• 16GB and 32GB configurations6
• 2 megapixel front-facing camera
• 5 megapixel rear-facing camera with LED flash
• Micro USB, Micro HDMI ports
• Micro SD card slot
• Wi-Fi (802.11b/g/n) and Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
• Gyroscope, Accelerometer, GPS, eCompass and Ambient Light Sensor
• Stereo speakers with sound enhancements by Toshiba and SRS Labs
• Built-in 25 watt-hour rechargeable lithium ion battery
• 10.1″ (W) x 6.9″ (D) x 0.3″ (H)
• 1.18 pounds (535g)

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HTC One V hands-on

Sunday, February 26th, 2012

Rounding out the trio of smartphones HTC unveiled at its Mobile World Congress 2012 press conference on Sunday is the HTC One V, an entry-level smartphone that picks up where the HTC Legend left off. This will be the most affordable One-branded smartphone HTC launches in the first half of the year, and while the specs don’t hold a candle to the One X or One V, this is absolutely a phone that will go far among budget-conscious consumers in Europe and other regions where the phone will be released. Check out our hands-on photo gallery below, and hit the break for the rest of our early impressions.

The first thing you will notice about the One V is definitely the return of the famous Android chin, which was found on a number of early HTC Android phones and most recently, the Legend. It’s definitely a unique design element and we think it works well on the One V. The case of this smartphone is unibody aluminum and it has a fantastic feel, especially considering it’s an entry-level phone.

Beyond the exterior hardware, you’re basically looking at a toned down version of the HTC One X and One S. It features a slightly stripped down version of the Sense UI — Sense 3.6 — and a single-core Snapdragon processor to keep costs down. The difference can be felt, of course, but for a phone that is likely to be free on contract from a number of carriers around the world, performance seems more than adequate.

We couldn’t really get a read on the One V’s 5-megapixel camera compared to the 8-megapixel sensor on the One X and One S, but we can definitely confirm that it snaps images just as quickly as its two higher-end counterparts. HTC’s investment in mobile imaging R&D really seems to have paid off, and the vendor’s rivals have some serious work to do to catch up.

HTC did not announce any launch details for the U.S. market, so we should likely expect the One V to stick to Europe and other markets in the first half of this year.

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HTC One V hands-on

Sunday, February 26th, 2012

Rounding out the trio of smartphones HTC unveiled at its Mobile World Congress 2012 press conference on Sunday is the HTC One V, an entry-level smartphone that picks up where the HTC Legend left off. This will be the most affordable One-branded smartphone HTC launches in the first half of the year, and while the specs don’t hold a candle to the One X or One V, this is absolutely a phone that will go far among budget-conscious consumers in Europe and other regions where the phone will be released. Check out our hands-on photo gallery below, and hit the break for the rest of our early impressions.

The first thing you will notice about the One V is definitely the return of the famous Android chin, which was found on a number of early HTC Android phones and most recently, the Legend. It’s definitely a unique design element and we think it works well on the One V. The case of this smartphone is unibody aluminum and it has a fantastic feel, especially considering it’s an entry-level phone.

Beyond the exterior hardware, you’re basically looking at a toned down version of the HTC One X and One S. It features a slightly stripped down version of the Sense UI — Sense 3.6 — and a single-core Snapdragon processor to keep costs down. The difference can be felt, of course, but for a phone that is likely to be free on contract from a number of carriers around the world, performance seems more than adequate.

We couldn’t really get a read on the One V’s 5-megapixel camera compared to the 8-megapixel sensor on the One X and One S, but we can definitely confirm that it snaps images just as quickly as its two higher-end counterparts. HTC’s investment in mobile imaging R&D really seems to have paid off, and the vendor’s rivals have some serious work to do to catch up.

HTC did not announce any launch details for the U.S. market, so we should likely expect the One V to stick to Europe and other markets in the first half of this year.

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A visualization of Apple’s market cap and cash [infographic]

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

Apple reported a monster first quarter last Tuesday that sent the company’s stock skyrocketing over the past week. Apple’s holiday quarter was the most profitable quarter ever reported by a technology company, and the second most profitable quarter reported by any U.S. firm. With a market capitalization that now sits in excess of $420 billion, Apple is currently the most valuable company in the world, and with more than $97.6 billion in cash and cash equivalents at the end of calendar 2011, Apple has amassed an unbelievable war chest that is unrivaled among its competitors. Business blog MBA Online recently put together an infographic to help us visualize just how big Apple has grown since it teetered on the brink of bankruptcy in the late 90s. Among the graphic’s bullet points are the facts that Apple’s year-end cash pile is enough to buy an iPad for each and every person living in Canada and Greece combined, and it’s also enough to pay off the entire public debt of eight countries within the European Union. The site’s full infographic follows below.

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Sprint’s move to roaming agreements sends AT&T to angry town

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

Despite all Sprint’s efforts to promote its Network Vision plans, the carrier has been much more coy about its intentions for subscribers in the rural midwest. It was recently revealed that the company plans to divest some of its infrastructure in Oklahoma and Kansas, where the carrier will instead rely on roaming agreements for voice and data. The move is primarily a cost-cutting measure, but one network — AT&T — is none too happy about the revelation. Ma Bell argues that Sprint is being too opportunistic following the FCC’s shuttering of the Home Market Rule, which (once upon a time) required carriers to build up infrastructure rather than rely on roaming agreements in areas where they held spectrum licenses.

With the Home Market Rule a thing of the past, AT&T suggests this move will merely be the tip of the iceberg for Sprint, as the carrier may now essentially piggyback on the investments of other providers. The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals is currently set to hear arguments on the matter this spring, and AT&T hopes the Court will “reject the FCC’s market intervention.” In the meantime, according to Ma Bell, Sprint’s actions are, “Nice work, if you can get it.” These are fighting words, indeed.

Naturally, Sprint isn’t taking these accusations lying down. In response, it states, “It’s disappointing, but not surprising, that AT&T wants to challenge a consumer’s right to access email, the Internet and other mobile broadband services wherever they may travel in the U.S.” Those interested can read the text in its entirety after the break.

Continue reading Sprint’s move to roaming agreements sends AT&T to angry town

Sprint’s move to roaming agreements sends AT&T to angry town originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 24 Jan 2012 22:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Apple to pass HP as the world’s top PC and tablet vendor

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

When counting tablets as personal computers, Apple will soon overtake Hewlett-Packard as the world’s top PC vendor. Based on a Fortune poll of 42 analysts, iPad sales could hit the 14 million mark in the fourth quarter, a big bump over the 11.12 million sold in the third quarter. Apple previously sold 4.89 million Macs, with holiday sales estimated to exceed 5 million units. When combined, both iPad and Mac sales are expected to be over 20 million units during the holiday quarter, which would be enough to push Apple past HP. The estimated sales would give the Cupertino-based company a 17.6% market share versus HP’s 13%. Asymco’s Horace Dediu noted that Apple has never held the top spot; the company’s market share peaked at 15.8% thanks to the Apple II in 1984. Last quarter, Apple surprised Wall Street when the company announced lower-than-expected earnings, however Apple is expected to crush estimates when it announces its December-quarter earnings on January 24th.

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America’s first Nokia Windows Phone already free on contract

Monday, January 16th, 2012

Nokia’s first Windows Phone-powered smartphone to launch in the United States is already available for free on contract. Nokia and T-Mobile unveiled the Nokia Lumia 710 last month and confirmed that while the handset is certainly not a flagship device, it will play an important role for Nokia as it re-enters the U.S. market. The 710 can’t hold a candle to the Lumia 900 Nokia and AT&T will be launching in March, but at $50, the Lumia 710 is an excellent entry-level smartphone. And at $0 on contract, the price Walmart is currently asking from new customers, the 710 is an unbelievable value. BGR reviewed the Lumia 710 earlier this month and we thought the phone could indeed be a great tool for Nokia and T-Mobile as they tries to convert feature phone users into smartphone customers.

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iPad satisfaction rate at 84% according to new survey

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

While electronics vendors struggle to gain traction in the emerging media tablet market, Apple has managed to maintain a significant lead in the space despite an increasing number of rival offerings. Apple’s share of the global tablet market in the third quarter was estimated to be 61.5% by market research firm IDC, and it’s not just momentum keeping the company’s market share high. Apple’s user experience on the iPad has been touted by many as having a huge lead over rival platforms, and the majority of iPad owners seem to agree according to the results of a recent survey. Read on for more.

Wichita State University’s Software Usability Research Laboratory conducted a survey of iPad owners and found that 83.65% of users are satisfied with the tablet. 62% rated the Apple tablet as “excellent,” 21% said it was “good” and 10% of respondents said it was the “best imaginable” tablet. 4% of those surveyed said the tablet was “fair,” 2% said it was “poor” and another 2% called the device “awful.”

SURL’s study used a small sample set of 52 respondents, but the results mirror a number of larger studies that sought to determine users’ satisfaction level with the iPad. Studies conducted by ChangeWave have found the iPad’s satisfaction rating to be as high as 95%, and a recent user survey conducted by PCWorld determined that the iPad is “miles ahead of the pack in durability, ease of use, and features such as battery life, screen quality, and overall speed.”

The Software Usability Research Laboratory at Wichita State University also found that apps continue to be a big draw for iPad users — 46% of users have between 21 and 60 apps installed on their iPads — and web browsing is still one of the most common uses for the Apple tablet. Almost 90% of respondents said they browse the Internet daily on their iPads while less than 70% said they checked their email each day, the second most popular iPad function according to the survey, and just over 60% said they read the news on their iPads every day.

[Via The Loop]

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