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Posts Tagged ‘Silicon’

China Times: HTC wants to develop its own processors for low-end phones

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

China Times: HTC wants to develop its own processors for low-end phones

Encroaching into the semiconductor business might not seem the most obvious move for a phone manufacturer that’s trying to unify its efforts. Nevertheless, China Times reports that HTC has signed a “memorandum of cooperation” with ST-Ericsson to co-develop a new dedicated chip for low-end handsets coming out next year. Since ST-Ericsson is a fabless chip designer, HTC won’t risk getting silicon between its fingernails. Instead, if this agreement is what it seems, the Taiwanese manufacturer may simply want more direct control over its supply chains and to reduce its current reliance on ready-made designs from Qualcomm or NVIDIA. After all, it can’t be easy for HTC’s new CFO, looking on while others gobbles up those margins.

China Times: HTC wants to develop its own processors for low-end phones originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Apr 2012 05:03:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Unwired View  |  sourceChina Times (Chinese)  | Email this | Comments

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Envia’s GM-backed battery delivers huge energy density, lower costs, headaches for competitors

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

If you’re one of those worried about the battery on your expensive EV running out, look away now. Envia has unveiled a new cell that boasts a record-breaking energy density of 400Wh/kg (most currently offer between 100 and 150). It’s estimated that when commercialized, this could bring the cost of a 300-mile range EV down to as little as $20,000. The performance gains come from a special manganese-rich cathode and silicon-carbon nano-composite anode combination. The battery maker is also partly owned by GM, which unsurprisingly means we’re likely to see these very cells in its EVs in the future. Perhaps with the right choice of upholstery, we might see even better savings? Want to know more? Tap the fully charged press release parked just after the break.

Continue reading Envia’s GM-backed battery delivers huge energy density, lower costs, headaches for competitors

Envia’s GM-backed battery delivers huge energy density, lower costs, headaches for competitors originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 29 Feb 2012 02:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Autoblog Green  |  sourceEnvia Systems  | Email this | Comments

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Quantum speed limits within reach, present moves ever closer to future

Sunday, January 29th, 2012

Got your wire-rimmed spectacles on? Had a full night’s rest? Eager to get those synapses firing? Here’s hoping, because Marc Cheneau and co. are doing everything they can to stretch the sheer meaning of quantum understanding. The aforesaid scientists recently published an article that details a method for measuring quantum particle interaction in a way that has previously been considered impossible. Put simply (or, as simply as possible), the famed Lieb-Robinson bound was “quantified experimentally for the first time, using a real quantum gas.” The techobabble rolls on quite severely from there, but the key here is realize just how much of an impact this has on the study of quantum entanglement, and in turn, quantum computing. For those interested in seeing what lives in a world beyond silicon, dig into the links below. You may never escape, though — just sayin’.

Quantum speed limits within reach, present moves ever closer to future originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 29 Jan 2012 17:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Gizmodo  |  sourceArsTechnica, Nature  | Email this | Comments

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Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Sleek and svelte Ultrabooks and tablets might have stolen the limelight from ye old netbook, but that doesn’t mean the less glamorous category is completely bereft of all signs of life. Take for example, Acer’s Aspire One 722. Sure, the 1GHz AMD C-50 powered, Radeon HD 6250 wielding netbook’s internals got more pizzazz in an updated Europe-only edition, but that didn’t stop AT&T from taking the original and giving it a new beginning thanks to shiny new internal WWAN module. Up-to-date silicon it is not, but it could be yours for just $40 a month — provided you sign your life away on a two-year, 3GB per month, contract. Or alternatively, the HSPA+ redux can be had for the unsubsidized price of $450. Decisions, decisions. Pull the trigger at the source link below.

Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Jan 2012 07:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Electronista  |  sourceAT&T  | Email this | Comments

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Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Sleek and svelte Ultrabooks and tablets might have stolen the limelight from ye old netbook, but that doesn’t mean the less glamorous category is completely bereft of all signs of life. Take for example, Acer’s Aspire One 722. Sure, the 1GHz AMD C-50 powered, Radeon HD 6250 wielding netbook’s internals got more pizzazz in an updated Europe-only edition, but that didn’t stop AT&T from taking the original and giving it a new beginning thanks to shiny new internal WWAN module. Up-to-date silicon it is not, but it could be yours for just $40 a month — provided you sign your life away on a two-year, 3GB per month, contract. Or alternatively, the HSPA+ redux can be had for the unsubsidized price of $450. Decisions, decisions. Pull the trigger at the source link below.

Acer’s Aspire One 722 kitted with HSPA+, sold by AT&T originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Jan 2012 07:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Electronista  |  sourceAT&T  | Email this | Comments

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Notion Ink’s Adam II promises TI OMAP CPUs, Ice Cream Sandwich, broken dreams

Saturday, January 21st, 2012
Notion Ink’s teaming up with TI in order to get at its OMAP4xx silicon for the forthcoming Adam II tablet. It’ll also be jamming in the company’s Wi-Link 7.0 and Phoenix Audio gear onto the Ice Cream Sandwich-running slate. The chip was apparently chosen thanks to its modular setup, HD visuals and powerful low-energy multitasking. Novice owners will also get their hands on a modular software architecture which will let casual users develop specific applications using a drag-and-drop interface. It’s pitching that functionality at home-brewers, students and professionals who can tailor the software to meet a specific need, casually mentioning that it could be used for signal processing, 3D modeling or medical imaging. Do we hear expectations being raised to unrealistic levels again? Given our experiences with the original, we suspect the answer is: “Yes.”

Continue reading Notion Ink’s Adam II promises TI OMAP CPUs, Ice Cream Sandwich, broken dreams

Notion Ink’s Adam II promises TI OMAP CPUs, Ice Cream Sandwich, broken dreams originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 21 Jan 2012 05:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Electronista  |  sourceNotion Ink  | Email this | Comments

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LG X3 supposedly leaks, to challenge HTC Edge as first quad-core phone?

Friday, January 20th, 2012
Your next tablet is going to rock a quad-core chip, so why not stuff that same silicon into your next phone too? Per PocketNow, that’s apparently what LG has up its sleeve with the forthcoming X3. Evidently, the four-core Tegra 3 device will also tote a 1280 x 720 4.7-inch display, 16GB of storage, Ice Cream Sandwich and NFC all in a svelte 9mm package. The whispers didn’t stop there, of course, indicating it’ll also wield 21Mbps HSPA support coupled with 802.11b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0. So will the X3 be the world’s first quad-core phone, much in the vein of LG’s G2X that preceded it? Or will it be beaten to the punch by HTC and Samsung? Here’s to hoping we’ll find out at MWC.

LG X3 supposedly leaks, to challenge HTC Edge as first quad-core phone? originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 20 Jan 2012 18:31:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink SlashGear  |  sourcePocketNow  | Email this | Comments

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Samsung Galaxy Note Notepad hands-on at CES: it’s like a Note, but analog

Sunday, January 15th, 2012

What if Samsung made a Galaxy Note, but instead of throwing a dual-core processor, a few megabytes (or gigabytes, whatever) of RAM, and random pieces of silicon between the front and rear covers, it included an undetermined amount of paper? What it we lived in a world where that type of activity was not only okay, but encouraged? What if the Note is actually the Notepad in a parallel universe? What if the aforesaid parallel universe is reality in Las Vegas, Nevada? Think about it.

Samsung Galaxy Note Notepad hands-on at CES: it’s like a Note, but analog originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 15 Jan 2012 05:19:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Microsoft leak reveals hotfix for underperforming Bulldozers

Sunday, December 18th, 2011
AMD’s Bulldozer silicon is enormously powerful, but most software isn’t configured to schedule threads for the faux-16 core design. Windows can only see the chip as a quad-core CPU and will randomly assign threads, which ruins the point of Bulldozer’s “Turbo Core” design. Microsoft inadvertently revealed it had teamed up with the chipmaker to fix the problem when it prematurely released a hotfix for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. Initial tests showed that it could improve performance by up to seven percent, before it was pulled — Microsoft conceding that it wasn’t quite ready for prime-time.

Microsoft leak reveals hotfix for underperforming Bulldozers originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 18 Dec 2011 05:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink AnandTech  |  sourceMicrosoft  | Email this | Comments

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Freescale Home Health Hub wants to usher in the era of connected medical devices

Saturday, November 19th, 2011
Home Health Hub

Freescale has its little silicon hands in all sorts of things: e-readers, smartphones, tablets, even refrigerators. Now the manufacturer is looking to make a dent in the healthcare industry with a connected platform called Home Health Hub (HHH). The i.MX28-based HHH isn’t an actual product, but a reference platform for others to build on. The ARM9 processor is connected to a host of networking interfaces, including WiFi, Bluetooth (as well as its low-power implementation), Zigbee, sub-1GHz and Ethernet. The Hub is supposed to be just that, a central point for connecting various medical devices like blood pressure monitors or glucometers that then feeds data to a tablet. Developers and other interested parties can get their hands on the reference platform from Digi International as the iDigi Telehealth Application Kit for $499. Check out the full PR after the break.

Continue reading Freescale Home Health Hub wants to usher in the era of connected medical devices

Freescale Home Health Hub wants to usher in the era of connected medical devices originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 19 Nov 2011 18:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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ASUS’ Eee Pad plans: Transformer Prime landing November 9th, two Win 8 tablets coming in 2012

Monday, October 31st, 2011

The Transformer Prime, with its quad-core silicon and tasty OS, has rightfully garnered much attention lately. A PowerPoint deck detailing ASUS’ Q3 earnings now gives us a peek at its Eee Pad strategy — confirming the aforementioned Prime’s November 9th release date, while also promising two more bot-powered slates in the first quarter of 2012. Of course, ASUS isn’t putting all of its eggs in the Android basket, as the same slide reveals that the Taiwanese firm will be getting its first two Windows 8 tablets to market by this time next year. So it seems that there will be an Eee Pad for all, whether you’re from Redmond or Mountain View. No need to shove, fellas, there’s room at ASUS’ tablet table for everybody.

ASUS’ Eee Pad plans: Transformer Prime landing November 9th, two Win 8 tablets coming in 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 31 Oct 2011 13:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Netbook News German (Translated)  |  sourceASUS (PDF)  | Email this | Comments

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Princeton neuroscientists map your brain, play words with subjects

Saturday, September 3rd, 2011

Don’t speak. Princeton researchers know just what you’re saying — kind of. Alright, so the Ivy league team of neuroscientists, led by Prof. Matthew Botvinick, can’t yet read your minds without the help of a functional MRI, but one day the group hopes to take your silent pauses and broadcast them for public consumption. By mapping highlighted areas of brain activity to words meditated upon by subjects, the group was able to create “semantic threads” based on “emotions, plans or socially oriented thoughts” associated with select neural activity. So, what good’ll these high-brow word association experiments do for us? For one, it could pave the way for automatic translation machines, extending a silicon-assisted grok into our nonverbal inner worlds that churns out computer-generated chatter; giving a voice to those incapable of speech. And if it’s used for bad? More terrifically horrific psychobabble poetry penned by Jewel’s unencumbered mind. Actually, wait. We might be into that.

Princeton neuroscientists map your brain, play words with subjects originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 03 Sep 2011 05:48:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink DVICE  |  sourcePrinceton  | Email this | Comments

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OEMs to spend more on semiconductors for wireless devices than computers in 2011

Sunday, August 14th, 2011

Well, if you didn’t believe that we live in a post-PC world before, the latest report from IHS iSuppli should help persuade you. According to its research, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) will have spent $55.4 billion on semiconductors for phones and tablets in 2011, as compared to just $53.1 billion on PC silicon. Of course, as the chart above shows, OEMs spent more money on wireless devices in 2008 and 2009. But, after an interlude of PC primacy in 2010, it looks like mobile’s where the money’s at for the foreseeable future — can’t say we didn’t warn you.

Continue reading OEMs to spend more on semiconductors for wireless devices than computers in 2011

OEMs to spend more on semiconductors for wireless devices than computers in 2011 originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 14 Aug 2011 06:41:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet and Keyboard Folio case hands-on (video)

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

Two Lenovo tablets in the same evening? Nah, it’s not the midsummer sun melting your cerebrum, but the same result just might happen after you ingest this one. True to rumors, the ThinkPad Tablet (yeah, that’s seriously the whole name) will indeed be shipping with a full-size USB port and an optional dedicated folio / case, and oddly enough, it’s that very peripheral that could set this unit apart from the masses. While it’s obviously no big chore to find a Bluetooth-enabled keyboard folio for the iPad, you probably won’t find a perfectly matching case with a tried-and-true Lenovo keyboard and a newfangled optical trackpad unless you’re ponying up for this guy. Internally, we’re looking at the same 1GHz Tegra 2 silicon as found in the more consumery IdeaPad K1, a 10.1-inch (1280 x 800) IPS display, a battery good for up to 8.7 hours of use, 1GB of RAM, 16/32/64GB of storage, 3-in-1 card reader, A-GPS, an accelerometer, ambient light sensor, front (2MP) / rear (5MP) cameras, a mini HDMI port (1080p capable!) and Lenovo’s own app launcher / app market.

In our discussions with Lenovo, it was made fairly clear that this guy was being aimed more at companies and less at consumers, but there’s absolutely nothing stopping the latter from enjoying a solid Honeycomb experience here. In fact, the ability to plug in a common mouse or trackpad (or combo device, for that matter) makes it far more useful than many of the ultraslim slates it’ll inevitably go up against. Also unique to the Tablet is a built-in active stylus, which is tailor-made to jot down highly important information cartoons in the company’s homegrown note-taking program.

The full-size USB port also puts it squarely in Eee Transformer territory, with the Keyboard Folio shown above making perfect use of it. In practice, the accessory worked beautifully, and while the $99 price tag may seem a bit steep, it’s not exactly cheap to go out and get a third-party case, keyboard and mouse. The company’s demanding $499 (and up) for it’s Android 3.1-based biz slate, with initial shipments starting today. Peek the hands-on video just after the break!

Continue reading Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet and Keyboard Folio case hands-on (video)

Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet and Keyboard Folio case hands-on (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 20 Jul 2011 00:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceLenovo [PDF]  | Email this | Comments

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Rugged gadgets put to the test in Engadget labs, wanton destruction ensues

Friday, July 1st, 2011
Rugged Gadgets

Lets be honest, we’ve all had those moments where we’ve wanted to hit our phone with a hammer or throw our laptop against the wall. Generally though, we resist those urges, knowing full well that it would spell the end for our precious gadget. There’s a special class of rugged devices though, that are designed to withstand anything you throw at it — or throw it at, as the case may be. We took a few of these beefy products, as well as one Extreme Sleeve for your non-military grade electronics, and put them through a battery of tests that would turn your average gadget into an unrecognizable pile of silicon and plastic. Head on after the break for a dose of dramatic destruction porn and to find out how this bevy of brawny portables held up against our gratuitous onslaught.

Continue reading Rugged gadgets put to the test in Engadget labs, wanton destruction ensues

Rugged gadgets put to the test in Engadget labs, wanton destruction ensues originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 01 Jul 2011 17:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wii U has last-gen Radeon inside, still more powerful than PS3 and Xbox 360

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011
Wii U Crysis

Slowly, but surely, we’re starting to piece together what’s going on inside that mysterious white box known as the Wii U. IBM was a little coy about the multi-core CPU it was providing, but did tantalize us by mentioning the name “Watson” in describing some of its underlying tech. Now details about the custom Radeon GPU are starting to surface and, while certainly capable, it’s not exactly cutting edge. At its heart is a chip similar to the R770 found in AMD’s last-gen cards like the 4890 and, before you dismiss the it, remember the PS3 and Xbox 360 are still capable of pumping out impressive visuals while packing five-year-old silicon (The 360 is essentially running a souped up ATI X1900). The custom core also supports Direct X 10.1 (Microsoft runs out of steam with Direct X 9) and Eyefinity-like multi-display tech for up to four SD video streams — though it’ll be up to Nintendo and developers to put that to good use. In case you’re still not convinced of the Wii U’s graphical prowess, Crytek has said its advanced CryEngine is “pretty much” up and running on Nintendo’s upcoming console — and, if it’s good enough for Crysis, it should be good enough for you.

Wii U has last-gen Radeon inside, still more powerful than PS3 and Xbox 360 originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 14 Jun 2011 12:24:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGame Watch, Develop  | Email this | Comments

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IBM Researchers Build Wonder Material Integrated Circuit Smaller than a Grain of Salt [Science]

Thursday, June 9th, 2011

IBM researchers have created the first graphene-based integrated circuit constructed on a wafer of silicon, in a setup that’s smaller than a grain of salt. The circuit is a broadband frequency mixer, which can operate up to a decent 10GHz. More »


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